New for fall (part one)

Autumn has so many iconic signs: shorter days, crisp temperatures, turning and falling leaves and the start of school. Each of us marks the change of the seasons with a different indicator, but all of us here at the Spinnery are feeling ready for the start of a new season!

As our youngsters head back to school this week, we are packing up for the first Sheep and Wool Festival of our Fall season. Next weekend in Jefferson Wisconsin we’ll be introducing several new patterns and colors!


First we’d like to introduce you to a lovely crescent shawl pattern created by Cap Sease: the Guilford Shawl.  This lushly garter stitch textured accessory is created with 2 skeins of our Simply Fine in the Variegated color.  The delicate lace border is worked as you go, so there is no seaming or finishing to slow you down.


Kate Salomon has designed two sweaters for this fall.  The first, shown above, is the Hatteras Cardigan.  This light layering piece is knit up with the Spinnery’s new 100% wool fingering weight yarn, Lana; and the fabric is appealingly comforting and breathable.

The pattern features an unusual top-down construction that creates a bias hem decorated with a twisted rib border.  It includes four sizes ranging from finished bust sizes of 38″ to 50″ and can be knit up with just 3 to 4 skeins of any of our Sock Art yarns.


On the warmer side, is the Beekeeper’s Smock.  This oversized pull-over features cuffs and a funnel neck decorated with a honeycomb cable pattern.  It also has contrast pop color pockets and lined neck for a touch of color that will play beautifully off the tweedy Yarn Over the pattern calls for.


This year’s limited edition version of our bulky recycled yarn comes in two colors, Smoke on the left and Flannel on the right.  The beekeeper’s smock can be knit up as quick as a wink with either 5 or 6 skeins (and an additional single skein or worsted weight Weekend Wool or Mountain Mohair for that fun pop of color).

And that’s not all!  Next week we’ll have more new patterns to share with you.  And, we’ll be premiering 6 new shades of our very popular Weekend Wool.

We hope that you can visit our booth in Jefferson, our mill in Putney or our website from the comfort of your own home over the next couple of weeks as all of our hard work this summer comes to fruition just in time for your autumn knitting plans.

What’s next?

You might think that the dog days of summer are no time to cast on with bulky wool (unless you have an air conditioned space to knit in). However, a new pattern has been published this week that may make you want to reconsider.

Twist Collective’s Fall Issue went live a few days ago and among the “pages” is a pattern designed by Kristen TenDyke: Rumford.  This delightfully cozy cardigan features Green Mountain Spinnery’s Capricorn yarn.


We particularly love the gentle halo created by our special blend of wool and mohair.  That fuzzy softness will make the sweater feel warmer and will protect your stitches from friction, making this single-ply more pill resistant than other yarn options with a similar construction.  Your creation will maintain it’s crisp cables and stand up to everyday wear.

The single ply has another added benefit, creating cables that are beautifully defined, without any ply shadows that make your stitches a bit less clear.


Our three un-dyed shades will knit up into neutral wardrobe staples that you’ll love wearing as temperatures drop.

Kristen’s pattern includes a generous sizing range from 31 1/2″ to 57 3/4″.  It is worked bottom-up with raglan decreases at the shoulder and has delicate cables on the front and back.

It is designed to be worn with very little positive ease and the subtle waist shaping ensures that it will flatter.  With a suggested gauge of just under 3 stitches per inch (in the stockinette sections) this cardigan will fly off your needles!


What’s not to love about Rumford?  We hope that you’ll check out this new edition of Twist Collective to see if you can find inspiration for your fall knits there.  We’d love to help you get started on any of the projects you’ll find.  We can offer yarn suggestions and go from there!


Thea Colman’s Greenbriar Cardigan

A couple of weeks ago we shared with our Facebook friends that Thea Colman (of Babycocktails fame) had published a new cardigan worth taking a look at.  Her new Greenbriar cardigan was designed with Spinnery Mewesic yarn.

© 2016 BabyCocktails

Thea fell in love with these skeins when she and Ellen Mason came to the Spinnery to teach our Knitter’s Weekend last fall.  As Thea says, “Green Mountain Spinnery’s Mewesic yarn is a beautiful tweed with subtle flecks of color that is just gorgeous in cables and lace – although in stockinette, the shades and texture of the tweed shine as well! With that in mind, Greenbriar features both.”  Thea worked her sweater up in the Mean Mr. Mustard color.

This top-down sweater uses the contiguous method to shape the shoulders.  It features one of Thea’s characteristic lace panels that is beautifully charted and written for your preference.  “The lace is easier to work than you’d think, since the stems and leaves are bold – making errors easy to spot.”

One of the reasons that Thea’s patterns are such a pleasure to knit is due to her thorough testing process.  Several knitters work up a range of sizes of the pattern (in this case there are a total of 9 options) to ensure that there are no mistakes or surprises.  Many of Thea’s test knitters chose to work up the pattern in several colors of Spinnery Mewesic, and we thought that you’d enjoy taking a look at how the sweater looks in a variety of colors.

greenbriar 02
© hummandknit

Sandy used Passionate Kisses to make her sweater.  Sandy shared her thoughts about the yarn in her project notes, “THE perfect pairing for this sweater pattern – I couldn’t stop taking close-up pics because I absolutely adore the little yellow flicks of color in the yarn!

I’m already looking through my stash, thinking about knitting another Greenbriar in another color – its’s just the perfect sweater pattern – – easily customizable, a fun lace and cable pattern, and then gorgeous stockinette to show off a tweedy yarn.”

greenbriar 03
© Dreamknitgirl
greenbriar 07
© Glennae













Both Kim and Glenna used Purple Haze for their sweaters. Kim modified the length of her sleeves and added a bit of delicate lace from another of Thea’s patterns: Eradour!

greenbriar 05
© BonnieP128

Bonnie used Blue Bayou to create a wardrobe classic in the perfect shade of washed denim.  “This is one of my favorite cardigans to date! The back lace/cable looks difficult but really isn’t … Mewesic is one of my favorite yarns; I used it for my Ommegang and over a year later there is not a pill to be found.” (Ommegang is a cowl necked pullover of Thea’s design that can also be knit up beautifully in Mewesic.)


With a baker’s dozen of colors to choose from, we hope that you’ll find the perfect shade to work with to make a Greenbriar cardigan of your own.  We are all eager to have one; our spinner Larisa has a Mean Mr. Mustard version on her needles and Maureen is working on one in Atlantis.

And for our readers and friends, Thea’s provided a special discount code to be used on Ravelry for $1 discount off of her Greenbriar pattern that is active until midnight Friday July 15th. Simply type in GMS when you check out, and you’ll receive Thea’s little gift!

We look forward to seeing more finished cardigans on Ravelry and hope to find yours among them!

Another spin

This week Kristin Tendyke’s new Goblet Cardigan has been pre-released by the folks at Interweave.  This pattern is part of a collection  from the designers featured in the upcoming Fall edition of Love of Knitting.  We love the classic lines of this sweater.

© Love of Knitting

The Goblet Cardigan has a generous range of sizing options from 30¾ to 53½” bust circumference, buttoned. (the sweater shown above measures 38¼”; modeled with ¼” of positive ease.)

This classic cardigan uses the same Juniper Cotton Comfort yarn you saw featured here a few weeks ago when we announced the arrival of Maureen Clark’s new Coming up Spring cardigan. (the sweater shown below measures 44″; modeled with 9″ of positive ease.)


Both patterns can be knit up with between 7-11 skeins of the delightful soft and bouncy blend of 80% wool and 20% cotton.  The tweedy blend of fibers makes the stockinette sections of both sweaters come alive with interesting texture.  And both feature delicate lace details that make each of these sweaters more feminine and fun to knit.


Meghan is shown with another version of the Coming Up Spring Cardigan knit at the 36″ bust size with 1½” of positive ease.  Her sweater features the Suede color of Cotton Comfort.  As you can see, knitting the pattern with less positive ease results in a very different fit that you may find more appealing.

We’re delighted to have a choice of patterns to play with this summer that can be worked up so beautifully in our favorite summer DK weight yarn; and hope that you’ll take a closer look at both of these projects for a wearable work of art of your own!

Announcing several new patterns

To accompany the new yarns that we’ve been working on this Spring, we have several new patterns releasing this week that we are very eager to share with you.

All of these new patterns will be making their debut at the Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival in Friendship, MD this weekend.  We hope that you’ll have a chance to visit our booth there to see these samples in person!


The first is a beautifully practical layering cardigan designed by Maureen Clark.  Coming Up Spring is knit up with Cotton Comfort for a lighter weight summer sweater.  We love having sweaters like this one to transition us through April and May when temperatures tend to vary from day to day and occassionally from hour to hour!

The pattern is knit flat in one piece from the bottom-up.  The sleeves are worked separately and seamed in during finishing.



The delicate botanical lace that runs along the bottom border of the sweater as well as cuffs is our favorite part of this feminine design.


We’ve also developed an asymmetrical and reversible shawl called Davis & Fuber (named after the Spinnery’s carding machine that is celebrating its centennial this year).  Seen here knit up with three skeins of the limited edition Moorit yarn and a contrasting pop of color supplied by a skein of Passionate Kisses Mewesic.

This shawl is comfortingly cozy and still light weight when knit up with any of the Spinnery’s other DK weight yarn options: Alpaca Elegance, New Mexico Organic or Sylvan Spirit.


Kate knit up a larger version  of the shawl with 4 skeins of Chai Alpaca Elgance and a pop contrast of a single skein of Mean Mr. Mustard Mewesic.  As you can see, the larger version provides a generous amount of fabric to wrap up in during colder months.

And with those colder temperatures in mind, our Granite Cap was designed to ward of winter’s chills.


This unisex beanie has a dense ribbed texture that stretches for a custom fit that feels like a hug.  It knits up as quick as a wink with a double strand of Green Mountain Green.

We hope that you enjoy knitting up any of these patterns that strikes your fancy.  We’d love to help you with your yarn selections, so plan a visit to the Spinnery or give us a call at 800-321-9665!


Course corrections

Kate had an “ah-hah” moment in the midst of working on a sample of Heidi Kirrmaier’s Vitamin D cardigan that we thought might be worth sharing.  She cast on for the top-down pattern using Spinnery Sylvan Spirit in the Sterling colorway.


She is thrilled with how the yarn is knitting up and things were sailing along smoothly until she started working her first sleeve.  Unlike similarly constructed top-down sweater patterns, Heidi has the knitter put the body stitches on hold while working the sleeves first.  The  pattern includes a note in italics explaining her directions.

“Note: instructions are for working the sleeve flat in order to ensure the same tension as yoke is maintained.”

Kate decided that the simplicity of working the sleeves in the round was worth any small shifts in tension that she was confident she could block out…do you see where this is going?

She didn’t have to work very far on her sleeve to have about an inch or two worth of stitches to test her theory.*

gauge a

The difference between the worked-flat stockinette and the worked-in-the-round stockinette more apparent in person.  There is a stitch per inch difference in the tension.  “What’s one stitch between friends?” you might ask.

Well, this creates a visible line in the fabric and more importantly translates into a substantial change in the finished measurements of the sleeve.  What should measure out at about 15 inches will in fact be closer to 12 1/2.  That is a difference that can’t be blocked out.

This shift in tension can often occur when switching between knitting and purling, but it can also happen when switching between needles made of different materials.  There is a fantastic article on Alexis Winslow’s blog Knit Darling that clearly illustrates how dramatic the effects of that switch can be.

Kate combined both by switching from carbon metal needles as she started her sleeve in the round.  Instead of cancelling each other out as she hoped, they combined to create a substantial change in tension.

So, Kate will frog back and instead follow the pattern working the sleeve flat using the same carbon needles she used for the yoke of the sweater.  We are looking forward to seeing the finished project that we know will be more successful for having been checked and adjusted.

*Kate is the first to agree that she could have figured this all out a head of time if she had swatched and blocked her sample ahead of time — but she prefers to dive into the deep end and check her progress as she goes.  She also recognizes that when that little voice tells you to stop and reconsider, you may find as Kate did, that it is worth listening to.


A new take on a classic Aran

The Aran sweater has a rich history, full of Irish island lore and fishing stories about the one that “got away”.  In the past, each cable included in the pattern acted as a symbol that could weave a tale about the home port or invoke a bountiful catch for the wearer.

Maureen has created a fresh new pattern that combines the reassuring comfort that we associate with these classic designs and thoughtful details that ensure a perfect and flattering fit.  We’d like to introduce you to Duncan.



Maureen has designed the pattern with a size range of 40″ to 51″ and has used set in sleeves to make sure that the sweater fits with a minimum of positive ease.  It is warm and snuggly  knit up with worsted weight Weekend Wool or Mountain Mohair; and will never create the impression that you are wearing a cardigan meant for your favorite Fisherman.


Shown here in the undyed White Weekend Wool, this 2-ply 100% wool yarn lends the sweater a crisp stitch definition making the cables pop.  And the classic creamy white color ensures that this sweater could work for any outfit making it a wardrobe staple that you reach for most months of the year (if you live in New England like we do).

We also love the addition of pockets that maintain the cable pattern for continuity but give us the option of warming our hands on a bitter cold or damp morning.

This sweater is sure to become a Spinnery classic and we can’t wait to see yours!

A light cardigan for shoulder season

Cap Sease has designed a new cardigan pattern that knits up into a perfect sweater for Spring.  Tekle is knit up in Spinnery Mewesic.  Shown here in our popular Blue Bayou color, it makes for a beautifully textured swingy layering piece whose design subtly shifts as you move.



The pattern includes a generous range of sizes extending from 34 to 54 inch bust measurements.  It uses a bottom up construction with sleeves that are picked up at shoulder and worked towards the wrist. A short band is added to finish the neckline and front of the sweater where buttons could be added if you’d prefer.  But we love the casual look of the open sweater as Cap envisioned it.

You could easily substitute some of our other DK weight yarn options in this pattern.  Using Sylvan Spirit would increase the drape of the finished piece and make the provide the textured stitches with a crisp pop.  Cotton Comfort would make for a lighter sweater that could extend the sweater’s wear further into warmer weather or for warmer climates.  And choosing Alpaca Elegance would result in a warmer sweater that could be perfect for Autumn or a better choice for folks who tend to easily catch a chill.

For those of you who may be curious, the design was named after a new arrival in Cap’s family.  This new addition to the Spinnery family of patterns is a welcome one, and we hope that you are as excited by this pattern as we are!

Rhinebeck projects

Our weekend in Rhinebeck was wonderful.  The New York Sheep & Wool Festival is a treat to attend every year and last week was no exception.  The weather was perfect (just brisk enough on Sunday to require woolen layers).  The fall color seemed to be at its peak and the crowds seemed delighted with their visit.  We loved seeing friends and making new ones.

One of our favorite aspects of the festival is the show and tell.  We had many friends stop by our little “shop” to show us what they’ve been working on and how beautifully their projects knit up with our yarns.  We thought we would share some of the ones were able to grab some photos of with you.

booboo 01booboo 02














Our friend Diane stopped by wearing this great hat that she knit up with the leftover yarn she had in her stash after finishing this beautiful sweater.  We just love how the Pine Warbler color of Spinnery Weekend Wool pops like the fall foliage and shows off her cables with crisp detail.

We got to talking with Liz while waiting in line for hot apple cider and fresh doughnuts.  She pulled on a stunning version of the Sugarleaf Sweater designed by Mary-Heather Cogar and part of the Rhinebeck Sweater collection published by Ysolda Teague last fall.


Liz created this beautiful cardigan with Spinnery New Mexico Organic and Alpaca Elegance in the Blue Lotus color for the lovely color work.  It looks stunning on her, don’t you think?

jenny 01

Our friend Jenny is modeling her version of Flyaway by Marji LaFreniere.  That beautiful drape is thanks to the Spinnery Sylvan Spirit she chose to work with in the Citrine color. The wool and Tencel blend lends the finished fabric of her sweater wonderful stitch definition and a swingy flattering shape.

We think that it is the details of this pattern that make it special.  The cables run up the spine, and merge under the arm as part of the raglan sleeve construction.

jenny backjenny 03b

















We want to thank all of you who stopped by the Spinnery booth to introduce yourselves. You had a chance to see what we’ve been working on and touch and see our yarns in person.  We hope that you’ll return next year with new projects to share with us or that we may have inspired you to come to Vermont for a visit to the Spinnery so that we don’t have to wait that long to see you again!

Maureen has designed a new sweater

We have a new Spinnery sweater pattern to share with you that beautifully highlights our new Mewesic yarn.


mewsic 02

Maureen was inspired by one of the first vivid colors we created this summer and started swatching.  This lace pattern became the basis for her new cardigan.  Passionate Kisses is named after the color she chose to knit with.

We love how the botanical lace pattern highlights the rich tweedy color.  It also creates a lightweight fabric that will ensure your finished sweater is versatile during the change of seasons.  Fall here in New England can bring dramatic temperature changes during the course of a typical day and this sweater is a stylish layering piece that is as beautiful as it is functional.

passionate 01kas passionate kisses














Maureen designed the scooped neck to be clasped with just three buttons at the neck, but you could add buttons all the way down the band if you’d prefer.

The pattern uses a seamed construction, a modified set in sleeve, and is worked in pieces from the bottom up.  It is a great choice for intermediate knitters eager to try out our new yarn with a larger project.


Which color would you cast on with?