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Posts Tagged ‘Mountain Mohair’

Meet a Spinnery knitter

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

If you have “liked” our page or postings on Facebook, you will have already seen some of the beautiful projects that our friend Melissa has created using Green Mountain Spinnery yarns.  We found her projects on Ravelry, and we thought it might be fun to learn a little bit more about Melissa.   We imagine that you will enjoy seeing some of her projects and finding out a bit more about what she loves to work on.

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Who taught you how to knit?

One day while exploring, my mom and I saw the book Knitting Pretty: Simple Instructions for 30 Fabulous Projects by Kris Percival.  We bought it thinking it would be fun to learn together.  At the time I had a long commute on the train, so I taught myself how to knit using that book.  About 5 years later I taught my mom; and even later I taught my daughter.

How were you introduced to Green Mountain Spinnery?

My husband, daughter and I had recently moved to New England and I saw an article about the Spinnery in a magazine.  The article mentioned that visitors could go on a tour.  I already loved the yarn and was curious to see how it was made – it seemed like a perfect reason to organize an outing.

We decided to make a girls’ trip out of it – my daughter and I met my mom in Putney and spent the weekend.  We explored the area and did many fun things. By far our favorite part was the Spinnery.

Do you have a favorite GMS yarn (and why)? ?

I love all of the colors of Mountain Mohair – they are great for colorwork.  But I bought a skein of Simply Fine (natural) at Rhinebeck and that is hands down my favorite.  I am planning to copy the booth sample of the Holden Shawlette – it was stunning.

holden

* The Holden Shawlette is a $6 pattern designed by Mindy Wilkes and is available on Ravelry.  Our sample seen above was knitted with a single skein of Simply Fine in the Variegated color.

What technique/skill have you most recently learned?

I recently knit the Lotus Blossom Hat by Melissa Johnson because I wanted to practice stranded colorwork.  It was the perfect project for that, and I knit most of the hat with yarn in both hands – it worked well, and it was a new technique for me!

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What technique/skill are you eager to tackle next?

I really enjoy knitting socks and am a big fan of DPNs, but I think I need to try Magic Looping.  That is next on my list.

You may want to friend Melissa on Ravelry so that you can see what she’s up to.  We know that whatever she casts on will be inspiring for the rest of us.  We can’t wait to see what Melissa knits up next!

Spotlight on Customer Projects

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

It will surprise no one that the Green Mountain Spinnery supports knitting and crochet as year-round activities. There is something particularly motivating though about winter weather that makes you reach for the yarn and needles; this winter especially requires extra warm layers! We’ve noticed many wonderful projects shared on Ravelry and wanted to shine a spotlight on them here as well!

fingerless glovesSplitbark Mittens

The first two projects are worked in Alpaca Elegance. On the left, elspethmuir’s N’s Fingerless Gloves which were completed as part of the Ravellenic Games! In the center are nmomoct28′s Splitbark mittens, looking lovely in the Cream colorway with the natural wood buttons. BasicHats’ Fair Isle hat is very much on trend with the purple and yellow combination in Cotton Comfort.

Shawl

Accessories like hats and gloves are wonderful due to their feeling of instant gratification. Finishing a larger project can be equally satisfying and thee knitters of these sweaters and shawl should feel quite proud! Nickeneck’s Mom’s Celestrial Mosaic is knit with Mountain Mohair and has a great depth of texture thanks to the color and stitch combination. Gretchen623′s Cardinal cardigan in the Poppy colorway of Weekend Wool is simply beautiful.

For even more project inspiration, check out our Ravelry group and Pinterest boards!

New Year, New Patterns

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Are your needles and hooks ready for something new? In this blog post we are rounding up the newest published patterns, including several from Green Mountain Spinnery, to inspire your next project!

First, the latest designs in your favorite Green Mountain Spinnery yarns. The Little Man Cardigan by Rachel Stecker is a top-down raglan sweater with inset pockets, contrast detail, and a pint-size shawl collar in Cotton Comfort. The Enterprise Hat by Eric Robinson is a great way to use up small amounts of Mountain Mohair or Weekend Wool. A garter stitch brim is worked flat, then folded for double warmth. When doubled around your neck the soft frills of the Frilly Mobius Cowl by Cap Sease will keep your neck warm with style; calls for Simply Fine.

Did you spot these recently published designs? Marly Bird, our featured workshop teacher for the upcoming Sugar Season Retreat, designed the Nottingham Sweater, which was the cover item on the Winter 2013 Love of Knitting. This sweater was originally knit in Wonderfully Woolly; Mountain Mohair or Weekend Wool would be great choices to substitute. Amy Herzog’s Noanet Peak set knits up quickly, is cozy warm, and has kicky stripes to keep you interested. Any combination of the Alpaca Elegance colorways would look wonderful. Calabash, designed by Amy Christoffers for the Winter 2013 Twist Collective, feels traditional and modern.

Like most of the United States this month, we’ve been dealing with truly frigid temperatures that make us glad we can stay warm in our handknit layers and under a pile of wool! Have any of the recent snow events or temperature dips inspired you to cast on a new project? Let us know on our Facebook page or in our Ravelry group!

 

November Knits Blog Tour: Market Jacket & Thayer Street

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

 

 

What comes to mind when you think of fall? At The Spinnery, in Putney, VT, we think of leaf-peeping in early October,  hiking with great views in great temperatures and no bugs, and bundling up in hand-knit sweaters.  November Knits is a new book by designers Courtney Kelley and Kate Gagnon Osborn. Here they act as “curators” of the twenty-three projects, two of which feature Green Mountain Spinnery yarns!

 

The Market Jacket is designed by Tanis Gray and is knit up in the ever classic Mountain Mohair.   As Tanis herself says on the Ravelry pattern page, “The three-quarter-length sleeves in this coat leave your arms and hands free to explore, while the wool/ mohair blend provides warmth. The cable-and-lace pattern reminds me of the vegetation on the forest floor, and the heathered yarn, with its golds, reds, and oranges, evokes the colors of changing leaves.”  This time of year is just about peak leaf-peeping season, and we agree that the Spice colorway of Mountain Mohair truly evokes the foliage.  Mountain Mohair is available in over thirty colors and would look fabulous in a more vibrant or more subtle hue that reflects your personality!  We create this premium yarn by hand, selecting the softest yearling mohair and spinning it with fine wool. It is also our best selling and longest running yarn; it is about 25 years old!

 

 

 

 

The second garment in November Knits is the Thayer Street Cardigan designed by Melissa Wherle uses Local Color, our DK-weight 100% U.S. Grown Certified Organic wool.  Inspired by school colors, fall sports, and rooting for the home team, this sweater is a modern take on the classic varsity cardigan, sans letter. Stripes are one of the easiest ways to introduce multiple colors in knitting- the combination of different stripe patterns makes them that much more interesting.  Our Local Color yarn comes from wool grown in New Mexico on the Manzares Ranch. Shown here in the Dark Indigo and Fern colorways, this yarn is dyed in small batches using Earthues Natural Dye Extracts mordanted with alum. This gentle handling maximizes the softness and elasticity of the natural fibers.

 

Interweave Press  has provided us with a copy of November Knits to give to one lucky commenter on this thread in our Ravelry group.  The winner will also receive 2 skeins of Mountain Mohair yarn! Please leave a comment letting us know what comes to mind when you think of fall! Did you know that here in Vermont many refer to the month of November as “Stick Season” ? It is too early for snow (usually) and too late for foliage.  Our colleague Laurie loves fall and November for being deer season! We will randomly draw a winner on October 18, 2012.  Be sure to check out the rest of the blog tour – the next stop is scheduled to happen at Veera Valimaki’s blog.

Early Fall Pattern Round Up & Inspiration!

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Wool season approaches! While the days have been pleasant, when the sun sets, you can feel the hint of a chill in the air. It is refreshing and makes many people eager to pull out their favorite sweaters and handknits, or cast on something new for this year.  We’d like to point out a few new patterns featuring Green Mountain Spinnery yarns and inspire you with projects made by our customers!

The Spinnery has two new patterns from Cap Sease. Cap’s Comfy Cardigan is the perfect cardigan to throw on when you curl up on a cold winter day with a cup of tea and a good book. Here it is shown in Jet Black Mountain Mohair. This yarn comes in over thirty colors so you can be as vibrant or subtle as you like. String of Pearls is an elegant cardigan sure to make any girl feel special. The sleeves and body are knit to the armholes, then joined for the yoke in a traditional shape. Sylvan Spirit in Blue Opal and Luminosity are used here; this yarn is soft with a satiny sheen.

In the Fall Twist Collective Fortune Bay by Mercedes Tarasovich-Clark, presents a twist on the classic boatneck pullover worked in one piece from the top down using Aplaca Elegance. Short rows create a diagonal mid-section in the allover narrow stripe pattern. Chai and Dark Roast are used to create this eye-catching sweater.

Our customers have been busy creating fantastic items as well! Ravelry user jcs65 recently finished her Gwendolyn using Maine Organic and Wonderfully Wooly.  Jocelynlally also used Wonderfully Wooly in her version of the Brownstone sweater.

We are seeing a lot of accessories finished lately as well.  Hilaryf used Sock Art Forest in her Jelly Beans socks. WoolyHeaded used Moutain Mohair, purchased at this year’s New Hampshire Sheep and Wool Festival, in the Turkish Rose Mittens.

 

Shawls are a great project for any season! Redsknits competed in the Ravellenic Games with this Thendara shawl using both Spinnery Sock Art Forest and Meadow. MaryDenise used Simply Fine in her Nimbus shawl

We would love to hear about your projects and plans for Fall knitting – leave a comment here, in our Ravelry group, or on our Facebook page.

Mohair & Joe David Ross

Monday, June 11th, 2012

Joe David Ross has supplied GMS with mohair since the mid 1980s. We met him through local farmer Deb Pamplin, a mohair grower in Wethersfield, Vermont. Deb had introduced the Spinnery to the possibilities of mohair when she started bringing fleeces to the Spinnery for processing.

Goat of fine fibre farm, Wethersfield, VT Photo by Marti Stone

 

 

Soon after, as we developed Mountain Mohair yarn, we soon outgrew our local supply.  Joe David became our main source for superior quality yearling mohair. The Spinnery has always been able to depend on the Ross Ranch in Sonora, Texas for fibers that meet our specifications, and Joe David goes the extra mile to make sure all the fiber he sends is well prepared to meet our needs.

The soft, fuzzy halo of our popular Mountain Mohair is the result of its mohair content. Over the years, many customers asked, “What’s a mo?” Mohair comes from the fleece of the Angora goat, an animal prized through the ages for its luxurious fiber. Angora goats took their name from the ancient Turkish city of Ankara; the term “mohair” apparently derives from the Arabic, mukhayya, which means “cloth of bright hair from a goat”. The Turks thought so highly of these special goats that none were exported until the sixteenth century. The first exports landed in Spain and France and none went to America until 1849.

 

 

Goats of fine fibre farm, Wethersfield, VT Photo by Marti Stone

Today, small flocks of Angora goats are found in New England and throughout the U.S., but 90% of American mohair comes from Texas, where the dry temperate climate is very suitable for the goats. The animals are generally sheared twice a year and yield on overage a three-pound fleece. Fiber of the youngest goats (kid mohair) is the softest; the fiber becomes coarser as the animal ages.

In 1992 we introduced Green Mountain Green, a blend of kid mohair and fine wool processed without petroleum. Again, Joe David was the source for the luxuriously soft kid mohair that makes the yarn so special. Today we have added Simply Fine and Sock Art Meadow to our products that include kid mohair.  To create these yarns and Mountain Mohair, we use about 2,000 pounds of mohair a year. That is equal to the fleece of about 600 goats! We are grateful to Joe David and his network of Texas mohair producers that are able to continue to offer us superior materials for our yarns.

 

We love to see your creations with our yarns – please share them with other Facebook fans or join our Ravelry group!

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