Spinnery News

New pattern suggestions for Cotton Comfort

We find that we and our friends reach for skeins of Cotton Comfort to work with as summer heats up.  Our DK weight blend of 80% of the finest wool we work with  and 20% organic cotton grown in Texas is a delight in the hands.  It has a comforting elasticity, a nubby texture and a color palette that is second only to our Mountain Mohair.

We wanted to use this week’s post to keep you up to date on some fresh new patterns that call for Cotton Comfort from some of Raverlry’s most popular designers.

Julie Weisenberger (of Cocoknits fame) recently publish Rosa, a figure flattering top-down pullover that is sure to become a classic.

© Cocoknits

The pattern features the Cocoknits Method of construction, “a commonsense system for knitting seamless, tailored sweaters from the top down. The Cocoknits Method is explained in detail in the book, Cocoknits Sweater Workshop by Julie Weisenberger, which includes 9 core patterns. The book is a necessary tool for knitting this and the other Cocoknits Method patterns.”

On a side note, Kate tried out this method of construction by knitting a version of Julie’s Antonia/Antonio sweater and was delighted by the clever construction and perfect fit created by this (new to her) English tailoring technique.  It creates a shoulder seam that the weight of the sweater can hang on, that sits a bit behind your shoulders for a more accurate fit and a better silhouette.  The anatomy of the sweater more closely mimics how our bodies move.  You’ll recognize the  look from machine knit sweaters in your wardrobe.

For those of you who would be more likely to wear a cardigan, you may want to consider taking a look at Asscher designed by by Christina Danaee as part of her StoneCutter Collection.

© Olive & West Photography

“The Asscher cardigan is an open, raglan cardigan featuring an angular eyelet pattern across the back. The eyelet shaping at the shoulders is echoed in the pattern on the back and the ribbed eyelet trim of the front. Green Mountain Spinnery’s Cotton Comfort yarn has a slight fleck of color creating a tweed-like appearance, and makes a perfect all-weather garment. Make one in any color to throw over jeans and a t-shirt, your favorite dress or layer with a flannel in colder weather.”

We agree that it looks like a perfect layering piece.

On the smaller side, is a kiddo knit for you to consider.  Summertime is a perfect time to select smaller projects that are easy to transport on your summer holidays.  New to Ravelry is Nemunoki designed by Simone Kereit, with sizes ranging from 3M to 2 years.

© Simone Kereit / OwlCat Designs

This darling little top could be worn as a wee dress and then layered over leggings as a tunic, extending its wearability.  We love the bright pop of color created by the slipped stitch texturing.

We hope that summer’s heat doesn’t prevent you from your favorite past time, and that the right project can keep you happily stitching (perhaps in front of an air conditioner) all season long.


What’s on our needles this week

We know how much fun it can be to take a look at what other people are working on, so we thought we’d share the “wips” on our needles this week.

While many of us are guilty of working on a handful of projects at any given moment, these are the projects that came to work with us this Thursday in the hopes that a few stitches could be worked at lunch or when our machines were humming along with occasional intervention.

Tracey is about a third of the way through an elegantly simple vest that will become a new wardrobe staple this fall.  She is working on His Vest designed by Churchmouse Yarns and Teas, with a few pattern modifications to adjust the length for a personalized fit.  She selected the Mean Mr. Mustard colorway from the Spinnery’s Mewesic line.

This lofty DK weight 100% wool yarn is a pleasure to work with and will make a lightweight and yet warm layer that will be perfect for in between season temperature swings.  Her pattern is worked flat from the bottom up, and seamed before the finishing touches of the ribbed v-neck and armholes is worked.

Kate is making some headway with her Clio pullover designed by Elizabeth Doherty.  Kate chose to work with the undyed Silver colorway of our Cotton Comfort.  The addition of 20% cotton in these skeins lends lovely nubbiness to the textured stitches and should make the fabric drape just a bit for a flattering finished piece.

Clio has a top-down, seamless construction that allows the knitter to try it on while in progress. The pattern includes instructions for two lengths making it a versatile option for everyone.  Maureen is also working on a version of this sweater and we hope to share photos of both finished projects soon.

Kate hopes to have this sweater complete in plenty of time to cast on another of Elizabeth’s designs before she arrives in October to teach at our Knitters Weekend.  We love having plenty of samples available to try on so that our friends and fellow students can find new project inspiration and leave the weekend knowing exactly which size of the pattern they want to cast on for.

Megan is very close to finishing a beautifully neutral version of Melody Hoffman’s Kimono pattern.  She selected the Fawn color of our Weekend Wool for a cozy, slouchy shrug that will go with every outfit.

“The pattern is very easy and comes up in three different sizes.  It features a little bit of lace, a lot of stockinette, and a very addictive slipped stitch panel on the back (a video is provided to help you execute the slipped stitch. It is knit flat, like a large rectangle, and a little bit of seaming brings the sides together to create the opening for the sleeves.”

So elegant!  We hope to share photos of her finished project when it is off her needles.

And last but not least, Larisa is putting the finishing touches on a new cowl pattern that will become available this fall.

Her infinity cowl design features an organic lace pattern inspired by the beautiful Latte Art to be found on the beverages served at Larisa’s favorite cafe in Bellows Falls.  This sneak peek shows her project with the Orchid colorway of our worsted weight Weekend Wool.

Check back here in several weeks for more details on this upcoming design!


Fresh eyes

A couple of weeks ago we were treated to a visit by the gals from A Verb for Keeping Warm.  This delightful crafting haven located in Oakland, CA takes “local yarn store” to a whole new level.  Kristen and her team host workshops, classes and KALs in their fresh and airy space that span a gamut from sewing fundamentals to hand dying with natural ingredients fresh from their garden.

We’ve partnered with them for the past several years to spin Pioneer; a deliciously lofty organic yarn from fiber grown from a nearby California flock.  You can read more about these very special skeins here.

Kristen and Sarah were in New England to teach at Squam and while they were in the “neighborhood” they opted to spend the better part of an afternoon with us, learning more about our production process and how their yarn is made.  They shared some of the photos and videos they captured that afternoon in their Instagram feed.  On the off chance you aren’t already following them, we wanted to share their impressions of the Spinnery, so that you can enjoy an armchair tour of the mill with a new tour guide!  (Below is a photo captured from a couple of short videos that are a bit hypnotizing).

“Last week at this time, Sarah and I were just returning from a remarkable trip to Green Mountain Spinnery in Vermont – where it was snowing with wool. 🌿 We made our first farm yarn (Pioneer) with GMS four years ago – a monumental event for Verb because we received the opportunity to work with hero Sally Fox and because of the great financial undertaking. We were scared! Though everything went really well and we are still making Pioneer. Now we also make Flock with GMS. So we are so happy to be able to finally see the mill in person! 🌿 I love seeing the old machinery used to create our yarn. This machine opens up the locks of wool, preparing the wool to be carded.”

“Once the wool is picked open, it is carded (video 1), then it is pulled into a long continuous strip aka roving (video 2), then carded again in the other direction (this is what makes Pioneer extra woolly) and then pulled into thin strips aka sliver (video 3) 🌿 I like the guest appearance of David in video 3. He is my contact at @greenmtnspinnery and who I discuss design. He is also one of my favorite people. In addition to talking about wool, we talk about the earth, poetry, meditation, politics, and staying present. 🌿 I asked how the Spinnery came about and was told that one of the two founders had sheep and learned there wasn’t any place nearby to turn her wool into yarn, so she thought “let’s make a mill” (sounds good to me). So the two founders travelled to England to look at machinery. I love thinking about pre-internet days and when you had an idea, you went out and looked, and talked to people. So they found a machine. And then found more vintage machines – piecing together the mill until it could take raw wool and turn it into tidy little skeins of yarn. ❤

“Once the yarn has been pulled into thin sliver, like you saw in yesterday’s video, then twist is added which is what this machine is doing – using the beautiful wooden bobbins.”

“A box of beautiful, vintage, wooden bobbins used in the spinning process at @greenmtnspinnery – I believe the boxes next to I are full of our new yarn! Details coming soon!”

“One of my favorite parts of Green Mountain Spinnery is the ephemera they have hung around the mill over the years: art from a young nephew, a quote from Maya Angelou “The question is not how to survive but how to thrive with compassion, humor, and style.”, portraits of young children factory workers as a remembrance of where we were, where some still are, and a reminder of what these old machines have lived through, fancy staff nameplates keeping it official, and sighting friends like @claraparkes (for those of you interested in wool, The Book of Wool is a must-have).”

We hope that you’ll plan on dropping by our mill at some point soon.  We’d be delighted to walk you through the production floor and give you a chance to see how our skeins are created and learn a bit more about the Spinnery’s rich history.  We’re confident that after your visit, you’ll never look at a simple skein of yarn the same way, again.


So many lucky winners

At the end of each day of the 2017 I-91 Shop Hop, each of the eleven participating shops will draw a raffle ticket from their collection gathered from the Shop Hop visitors that stopped into their shop that day.  Over the course of the weekend, 44 tickets will be drawn!

These raffle winners will receive a gift bag like the ones shown above, which we have set aside for the four winners that we’ll select.  By visiting a few shops along the Shop Hop, it is entirely possible that folks could win more than just one!  Along with goodies from the Spinnery, these bags contain items from the Shop Hop’s generous sponsors:

Accessories Unlimited, Berroco, Inc., Brown Sheep Company, Bryson Distributing, Cascade Yarns, Churchmouse Yarns & Teas, CLassic Elite Yarns, Frabjous Fibers, Knitting Fever/Euro Yarns, Madelinetosh, Malabrigo Yarns, Misti Alpaca, Mountain Colors, Nancy’s Knit Knacks, Plymouth Yarn Company, Rowan/Schachenmayr, Schact Spindle Company, Sirdar USA, Skacel Collection, Tahki/Stacy Charles, and Westing Bridge – Chia Goo Needles.

And that is in addition to the GRAND PRIZE winner whose prize includes gift certificates for the 11 shops, as well as yarns, needles and other goodies!  You can be entered into this drawing by visiting all 11 shops, getting your passport stamped in each shop, and submitting your completed passport at your last shop before 5pm on Sunday 6/25.

You can learn a more about the fun on the Shop Hop’s Facebook page.  We hope that you’ll decide to join the fun this weekend.  We look forward to seeing you soon!


When its too hot to knit

We had a few sweltering days here in Vermont last week that gave us a preview of the upcoming weeks’ heat.  When temperatures rise, we knitters tend to gravitate towards lighter yarns, different fiber blends or cooler gathering spaces so that we can continue to work with the wooly yarns we love.  None of us enjoy a lapful of  warmth when its hot and sticky.

If you find yourself feeling too hot to want to work on your woolens, you may also want to consider putting your project down and reading about the craft instead of doing it!

We’ve received a stack of delightful new crafting magazines that have us eager to find a shady spot, enjoy an icy beverage and crack open these covers to learn something new.

The newest issue of Amirisu focuses on the search for natural colors providing a couple of articles and interviews about natural dying yarns and fabric with plants ranging from the familiar indigo to the deep reds made possible with safflower.  The magazine also includes 8 new patterns that are perfectly suited to summer knitting and crocheting.

The second issue of rib magazine arrived in the shop just a few days ago and we are delighted with the wealth of patterns for men included among its pages.  But the two thoughtful essays included in this issue are just as appealing.  Tom Van Deijnen’s well illustrated how to article provides detailed instructions on visible repair techniques.  Holes and snags can be easily repaired, and your handiwork will embellish your knitwear with a beautiful reminder of how life’s snags can sometimes create result in unexpected beauty.

Carrie Bostick Hoge’s newest collaboration in Making No. 3 Dots has gathered a stunning array of patterns, recipes, and projects that may inspire you to branch out and experiment with embroidery, needle felting, sewing, weaving or crochet.  You could imagine yourself at summer camp and give yourself a few days to  play with new techniques!

We invite you to browse among our magazine selection and find an issue or two that you could enjoy paging through.  Perhaps there are a few leisurely hours in a hammock ahead of you in the weeks to come with a good read.  Your works in progress will wait on the needles until it is cool enough to work on them comfortably!


Not long now

The I-91 Shop Hop is just a couple of weeks away!  From Thursday June 22nd – Sunday June 25th, eleven yarn shops along the roughly 130 mile 1-91 corridor between New Haven, CT and Putney Vermont will open our doors for a terrific yarn crawl that you shouldn’t miss!

Stop in your participating LYS and purchase your Shop Hop passport for $5.  Or you can find one on our website here (while our supply lasts).

Along with your passport you’ll receive a tote bag with the map and details about each of the eleven fabulous shops.  If you haven’t visited them before, this weekend is a great time to stop by.  You might win a prize for simply visiting!

Get your Shop Hop passport stamped by visiting the participating shops over the 4-day Shop Hop weekend (June 22nd – 25th, 2017).  Every time you get your passport stamped you willed be entered to win the Daily Door Prize at that shop. A total of 44 door prizes will be given out to participants!  By visiting all 11 shops you will be entered into a drawing for the fabulous Grand Prize, which includes gift certificates for the 11 shops, as well as yarns, needles and other goodies.

Designers from each shop have created patterns in honor of this event, so you’ll find project ideas that will extend from your head to your toes.  We’ll be able to share details of our pattern on social media that weekend, so be sure to tune in!

You can complete the Shop Hop all in one day, or make it a weekend event.  We’ve had Hop visitors in years past tell us that they found a place to stay along the way, giving them more time to enjoy the shops and explore the area.  We hope that you’ll share the details with your friends and find out if they’d like to join you for a fun outing or even better a weekend away.

To help your travel plans, we thought we’d share some of our favorite local spots for a delicious meal or two on the off chance you wanted to make this year’s Hop a more leisurely experience.

Here in Putney, VT off of Exit 4 of I-91 you can find delicious BBQ at Curtis’ for lunch or dinner.  He’ll be open throughout the weekend from 10 am until dusk. There is plenty of outdoor seating, so if the weather is beautiful you may find you can’t resist the call of his smoke.  We also enjoy the sandwiches, snacks and espresso drinks at the Putney Food Co-op.  Both of these spots are just up the road from the Spinnery, no more than a 2 minute drive away.

In Brattleboro, on Route 5 running in between exit 2 and 3 of I-91 you’ll find a couple of terrific eateries.  For breakfast or lunch on Thursday and Friday, we urge you to try The Porch Too.  Their daily specials can be found on their Facebook page and have never disappointed.  Right next door, Top of the Hill Grill has some of the most beautiful outdoor seating around, with a view of the West River watershed and a diverse menu that is sure to have something that appeals to everyone travelling with you.

In downtown Brattleboro off of exit 2 of I-91 you’ll find a local favorite Mocha Joe’s right down the street from the next shop on the Hop: Handknits.  The baristas there will make a caffeinated work of art to pick you up if you find your energy lagging.

We’re sure that the other shops along the Hop will each be able to provide you with more insider tips on local treasures not to be missed.  We look forward to seeing you soon and hearing a bit about your Hop travels during your woolly weekend of fun!


Protecting your hand knits

The unofficial start of summer with Memorial Day weekend has many of us thinking about storing our winter woolens away for the season.  Ensuring that our hand knits will be clean and in good repair when we’re ready to pull them out of storage in the Fall, will allow us to start wearing them without delay when we’re ready to bring them back into wardrobe rotation.

Martha Stewart has a terrific article about mothproofing that includes the how and why of the multiple steps involved in preparing your woolens to ensure the best results.  You can find the full article on her website here.

In a nutshell, “cleaning woolens rids them of moth and beetle eggs and also eliminates perspiration remnants and food spills, which attract and nourish pests. Moths and beetles don’t eat items made of synthetic or cotton fabrics, but you should clean those, too, if you store them with woolens.”

Taking the time to inspect each item before putting it away for the season can give you a moment to look for signs of wear that may need a bit of darning.  We also like to de-pill our well loved garments to revitalize them.  This way they will emerge from storage ready to wear and looking their best.

Since the pests that love to munch holes in our woolens are so small and able to wriggle into the tightest of crannies, the best short term storage is air-tight.  If you are planning to put things away for stretches of time longer than a year, you may want to do a bit of web research to find alternate options that will be impervious to small pests and yet allow your clothes to breathe.  Trapping moisture inside an airtight container with your woolens would lead to another set of problems.

To clean our shop samples, we add like colors into a top-loading washer that will allow us to soak the items without agitation.  You could also soak items one at a time (particularly if you have concerns about colors bleeding) in a sink, large bowl or bucket.  We add a splash of Eucalan, but you may want to consider using any of the other wool washes available on the market.  The milder the detergent the better.

After a 20-30 minute soak,  we allow the machine to spin out the items removing as much water as possible.  You could squeeze your items (without wringing them) and then roll them up in dry towels like a burrito.  Walking across the burrito will remove even more water and render your woolens just damp to the touch.

Lay your items out someplace flat, out of direct sunlight, where they can dry undisturbed.  You can use this opportunity to re-block your items into your desired measurements.  You may want to select your washing day based on the weather forecast, selecting a time when you’ll have several dry days in a row giving your woolens plenty of time to dry completely.   If the forecast doesn’t cooperate but you have a dehumidifier, you may want to dry your woolens in close proximity to it for similar results.  Here in the damp Northeast, that can be essential for success.

Cedar and lavender both provide natural pest protection (with some limitations) that leave a pleasant scent behind.  We’ve recently received a small shipment of some locally crafted cedar hanger rings.  Each dozen is available for $15 and you can find them on our website here.  Adding these to the cleaned items in your closet or within air-tight storage containers can help maintain your hand knits’ integrity.

If you find holes or signs of moth damage, your best resort is to freeze those pests out!  We “put items in sealed plastic bags, squeeze out air, and freeze for a few days. Take the bags out, let them return to room temperature (or better yet, place them in a hot car in the summer sun), and then repeat. In case of condensation, let clothes air out before storing again.”

If you need some expert help repairing larger holes, give us a call and we can put you in touch with a local knitter who has worked miracles for our customers over the years.  Susan has provided flawless finishing, button hole repair and mending work for many of our friends who are are too busy or reluctant to try their hand on precious hand knits that took many hours to complete.

Feel free to give us a call if you have any questions as you dive into washing your woolens for summer storage.  We’d love to share our suggestions and any additional tips that could help.


How and where do you wear your Tekle?

Cap Sease’s Tekle sweater is one of last year’s most popular sweater patterns.  This cardigan is knit from the bottom up and features a rich textured stitch pattern achieved by alternating knits and purls.  This subtle design catches the light and makes the finished sweater look far more sophisticated and complex than it is to create!

We’ve found that mill visitors often comment on the sample we have in the shop, and wonder aloud how one would wear a cardigan that doesn’t have buttons.  Our scourer Meghan popped it on this week and we followed her on her various adventures to see how practically the sweater wears in real life.

The pattern calls for a DK weight yarn and that knits up with our Blue Bayou Mewesic (as seen here) into a lightweight layer that is perfectly suited to shoulder season use.  As early summer (and late fall) temperatures swing from dawn and dusk lows to mid-day highs, or even when a partially cloudy day has you alternately warm and cool, Tekle can be tossed over your shoulders to keep you comfortable.

Meghan found that she reached for it to warm her for an after work canoe launch on the Connecticut River and as an extra layer for a walk along a country road to gather flowers at lunch time.

It is perfect to have handy in the back of the car to throw on in anticipation of cooler air-conditioned spaces like a movie theater, an office or the produce section.

Adding a fun pin or broach to pin it closed can dress it up, add a bright pop of color, and change the silhouette of the sweater to a more figure flattering and feminine one. Layering your sweater like this can also allow you more wear of your favorite sundresses that might be too cool to wear comfortably except in the height of summer.

Meghan has been known to grab whatever is handy to act as an impromptu closure.  Who among us doesn’t have a convenient dpn on hand in a pinch?

We love the idea of enjoying hand knits every day. The recommended hand washing of our knitwear shouldn’t relegate your sweaters to the closet only to be worn for special occasions.  Tekle is as perfectly suited to the greenhouse as it is to the coffee house.  Loose soil can be brushed off. Stickier mud can be allowed to dry before a similar treatment, and spot washing with gentle detergent is always an option.

We hope that you’ll get more wear out of your favorite hand knits before summer’s heat motivates us to put them away until Fall.  And take another look at Cap’s Tekle cardigan.  You may find it as appealing  and useful as Meghan does!


Holiday weekend plans

We’d like to give you a reason to plan a road trip to southern Vermont for your Memorial Day weekend.  Next Saturday through Monday the Spinnery will be hosting its annual Tent Sale!

Our shop will be open from 10 am – 5:30 pm all three days and we’ll have special items available in the shop that you won’t find among our sale yarns on the website.

We are going to be able to offer special savings on a large selection of irregular and orphan skeins.  These will be available at just $5 and $8 respectively.  Irregular skeins may have slubby bits or more than one knot; and our orphan skeins are the last remainders of older dye lots that are perfect for larger projects that call for multiple colors or smaller accessories that need smaller yardage amounts.  Because these quantities are limited, they are only going to be available to our tent sale customers that visit the shop in person.

While you’re here you can also take advantage of our Book Sale.  All in stock books will be discounted 30%!

You can download a copy of our sales flyer here.  This includes all of the odd weight and unwashed skeins that we have available in larger quantities.  These yarns will be discounted from 30 – 40% and will be available in the Sale Items section of our website while supplies last.  Be sure to check back on Friday May 26th when those skeins become available for sale.


Remember, wool is warm even when wet!

The forecast indicates that we may get some showers on Sunday in Deerfield, NH.  So we encourage you to come explore the New Hampshire Sheep & Wool Festival on Saturday before the rain arrives.  Or better yet, bring your wellies and a good rain jacket so that you can wander around in perfect comfort.

The fun begins at 9 am on Saturday morning and the festival is open from 9-5 pm and then again for 9 – 4 pm on Sunday.  You’ll find workshops, demonstrations, lectures and more.

There is even a showing of “Yarn” the Movie scheduled for 5:30 on Saturday evening. You’ll want to bring your own chair. $5.00 for adult, $2.00 for children 12 and under.  You can find a full schedule of events here.

We’ll be among the dozens of vendors providing wooly wares of all kinds!  You’ll find our booth in Building C, not far from Dairy Barn 1 where you’ll get a chance to meet the real stars of this gathering.

As this is the year of the Shearer, shearing demonstrations will be taking place all day in “shearer’s corner” near the main gate and the sheep display area in Dairy Barn 1.  Both mechanical and blade will be demonstrated and shearers will answer your questions.

And for the more crafty, from  12-3 on Sunday, May 14, in the Dairy and Beef Barn 1 (Building H), Local 4-H youth with demonstrate their fiber skills by turning a fleece into a scarf! The process of carding, spinning, weaving, and embellishing with felted wool will be shown using a freshly shorn fleece. Come watch, learn, and encourage local 4-H’ers as they put their fiber skills into action!

We hope that you’ll choose to spend a part of your Mothers’ Day weekend with us at the festival.  Bring your recently finished projects for show and tell.  We’d love to see what you’ve been working on since we saw you last!

 


Care to join the fun?

Today is Green Up Day in Vermont.

“Green Up Day, always the first Saturday in May, was launched in 1970 by Governor Deane Davis. Since 1979, the non-profit organization Green Up Vermont proudly carries on the tradition of Green Up Day. It is an annual statewide event, when over 22,000 volunteers come together to remove litter from Vermont’s roadsides and public spaces.”

It’s a great excuse to go for a leisurely walk and enjoy the changing countryside.

Communities all around the state will be offering special pick-up and drop-off spots for rubbish bags; and you may find a nearby gathering with refreshments available.  You can find a listing of all the participating communities here.   What a great way to meet your neighbors and celebrate the arrival of spring blossoms and new leaves!

We hope that this Vermont tradition inspires you to head out this weekend and make your community a bit more beautiful.


Upcoming fiber fun in Connecticut

Next Saturday there will be two nearby fiber gatherings that you’ll want to make note of.  In Vernon, CT the Connecticut Sheep Breeders Association will be hosting their 108th Annual Sheep, Wool & Fiber Festival from 9am – 4pm.

Here, you’ll get a chance to enjoy workshops, demonstrations, as well as “fiber of all types, fiber tools, dyes, finished goods, soaps, herbals, local CT cheese and a variety of other quality items produced by small farms and businesses from the North East.”  You’ll also get a chance to see sheep being sheared, which is a sight to see!

Over in Hartford, starting on Thursday, April 27th; Stitches United will be drawing crafters of all kinds to the Connecticut Convention Center.  The former Stitches East has expanded to include quilting, sewing, cross stitch, and more.  Now, those of us equally inspired by yarn and fabric have a gathering that provides classes and shopping for all our passions.

This event presents all of us with an exciting opportunity to expand our crafting repertoire with new skills!  Registration for classes is still open.  We invite you to peruse the generous list of offerings and see if there is something there that you’ve always wanted to try.  The selection is remarkable, from the ergonomics of knitting to hand sewing bow ties.  What fun!

Maureen and Kate from the Spinnery will be on hand in the marketplace giving visitors a chance to peruse our newest patterns and yarns.  We invite you to visit our booth and show us what you’ve been working on since we’ve seen you last!  We look forward to catching up and sharing our passion for craft!