Soon to be released

As you may have seen on Instagram, a new issue of By Hand Serial is due to be released later this month and it focuses on our neck of the woods!

“In Issue #11 of By Hand Serial, we visit New England as we travel through Vermont and New Hampshire at the peak of the fall foliage season.

The New England makers we meet have a great love and deference for their land, their communities, and the region’s history and traditions. These artists pair local resources with traditional forms of creating: milling yarn, weaving cloth, sewing garments, making baskets for daily use. Form and functionality mesh seamlessly, creating beautiful materials that find use and purpose in our everyday lives. It is a joy to learn more about these makers, their materials and motivations, and the work they do to keep alive the values of hard work, handcraft, and artistry.”

© Jenn Bakos Photography

We are thrilled that this issue includes a new pullover sweater design by our dear friend Amy Christoffers.  Her Spruce Peak Pullover calls for Spinnery Mewesic!  “Mewesic yarn, a 100% wool with just the right amount of heft and texture to show off the lace stitches that make up the body of this garment.”  ⁠

The pattern is worked in the round from the bottom-up and features a readily memorized lace pattern.  The front and back are split at the armhole to be worked separately and then joined at the shoulder with a 3-needle bind off.  The stitches for the sleeves are then picked up and worked down to the cuff.

You’ll be as delighted as we are with her generous size range.  This sweater is designed to fit bust sizes 37-72″ with between 2-12″ positive ease.  The yarn requirements for the sizes 37 (41, 46, 50, 54)(59, 63, 68, 72)” call for 5 (6, 7, 7, 8)(9, 10, 11, 12) skeins of our DK weight yarn.

We got so excited about this new design that we asked Amy to share an early copy of the pattern with us.  Our scourer Megan has made quick progress on her version of the Spruce Peak Pullover with our new Touch of Grey color.  We hope to have this beauty ready to display at our booth at Vogue Knitting Live in New York City next weekend.

You can pre-order a copy of Lookbook 11: Vermont & New Hampshire from us. It will ship to you on the official release date, 1/25/20 without delay!  In the meantime, we hope that you’ll be able to join the fun of the fiber festival in Manhattan.  We have all kinds of fun new things to share with you there.


A feast for the senses

Happy Holiday!  We hope that your day will be filled with delicious traditions to be shared among friends, family and neighbors.

Over the Holiday Weekend after Thanksgiving, the Spinnery will be open special hours as a participant in the 41st Putney Craft Tour.  Over this special weekend local artists and craftspeople open their studios to the public, offering you a unique opportunity to see them at work, learn more about their creative process and find artfully made holiday gifts that support their endeavors.  While you are exploring the area, we hope that you’ll be able to visit our Mill to share in the exciting wooly offerings that we’ll have on hand.

We’re releasing a new FREE pattern for the holiday knitting season.  Our Gathering Hat is a very quick knit, making it a great option for last minute gift making.

This sturdy topper calls for bulky yarn and can be worked up in just a few hours with a single skein of Yarn Over or our Capricorn yarns.  The hat is worked from the bottom up. featuring slipped stitch ribbing and clever decreases that form a five pointed star at the top.  The pattern is charted for your ease.

We’ll also have a fresh stock of our very popular Ugly Christmas Hat Project Kits.  This fun project kit includes all the yarn and the pattern to make an ugly holiday hat of your own for just $32.75. If you aren’t a knitter, but know someone on your gift list who is, you may want to pick one up as a gift that will certainly bring some laughter to your holiday gathering.

And last but certainly not least will be our annual Sample Sale! We’ve selected dozens of beautifully handknit items that are ready to find new homes.  These items were made to test our patterns and provide several color or sizing options among our sample selection to help visitors plan their projects.  We are bursting at the seams with gorgeous samples that can now be retired to make room for what’s next.  You’ll be able to find sweaters, hats and more!

This offers you an amazing opportunity to purchase hand knit items made with Green Mountain Spinnery yarns at unbelievably reasonable prices.  Plus, a percentage of the proceeds from these items will go to benefit the Putney Food Shelf: our local foodbank that needs our support especially during the holidays.

We hope that we’ve succeeded in enticing you to come and visit.  The Spinnery will be open 10 am – 5 pm Friday November 29 – Sunday December 1st; and we can’t wait to see you!


Simply Fine Skinnies

We’ve got a new yarn to share with you this week, our Simply Fine Skinnies!

These gorgeous skeins of blended bale-dyed fine wool and baby soft kid mohair are put up in skeins that have half the yardage of our undyed Simply Fine skeins that you already know and love.  This yarn includes the softest fiber that we work with at the Spinnery; and now is available in an irresistible spectrum of luscious colors that could be used for some of this season’s most popular patterns that call for fingering or sport weight yarn.

Thanks to our woolen spinning process and this yarn’s single ply construction, it blooms beautifully when washed.  This allows it to gracefully accommodate a wide range of gauges.

Kate quickly cast on with a skein of the Golden Hour color to make a Thermal Cap.  Just one 224 yard skein provides more than enough yardage for the FREE pattern.  It knits up quickly for a light weight cap that is perfect for crisp autumn mornings.

These beautiful skeins could also be used to work up a stunning Mercury Rising Shawl.  You’d need 2 skeins each of two contrasting colors.  Or you might want to consider pairing a single pop of color with one of the neutral undyed options. You could even try working the pattern with four different colors.  What a fun experiment!

All 9 colors have been named for some of our favorite simple pleasures from gazing at the stars on a clear dark night, to the smell of woodsmoke in the air on a crisp cool morning.

We can’t think of a better way to celebrate Fall than with some seasonal color on our needles.  We hope that you find working with this yarn to become one of your simple pleasures. Enjoy!


Tune in to Larisa and Marly

Marly Bird’s interview with Larisa is now available on Youtube!  You can watch our favorite Yarn Thing Podcast episode any time you like.  We recommend having a project in hand (as long as you’re not following a complicated chart).

We hope that you’ll enjoy tuning in and learning a little bit more about the Spinnery.  Plus, there is a contest that you could win!

You could be eligible to win a copy of our newest pattern collection, At the Spinnery, by heading over to Marly’s website and adding a comment about her video there.  You’ll need to watch the video to learn the keyword (that Larisa and Marly will provide) and be sure to include that in your comments.

And elsewhere on the internet, our friend Mina Phillips (of Knitting Expat Designs) has just published a darling cropped pullover with Spinnery Mewesic.

© Knitting Expat Designs

Her Yorkville Sweater is a natural extension of her New York Hat Collection that she published last fall with a variety of Spinnery yarns.  Like the seven hat patterns, this sweater features lush texturing that works beautifully with the tweedy rich colors of our DK weight yarn offerings.

Her sweater shown above is knit up in the Brickhouse colorway in the 42″ size with approximately 4 inches of positive ease.  Her pattern is available in ten sizes ranging from a finished chest circumference size of 30.5″ – 65.5″.

She has very generously created several coupon codes to provide a sliding scale of pricing to make the pattern available to a broader range of knitters.  She asks that you pay what you can, understanding that the full price of the pattern fairly compensates her for all the work and time she put into developing this beautiful design.

We love that this pattern can be worked from the top-down allowing you for a custom fit that will be the perfect length to highlight your curves or act as a comfy layering piece for three season wear.


Retrospective

Today marks the 96th International Cooperative day, so we thought we’d look back on the history of the Spinnery. Our origin story is one of thoughtful intentions made real through cooperative participation.

In the late 70’s Claire Wilson (a journeyman weaver), Libby Mills (a teacher and founder of the fiber program at The Putney School), David Ritchie and Diana Wahle (both recent graduates of the School for International Training in Brattleboro), began a conversation that would change their lives.  Inspired by their study group discussion around E.F Shumacher’s Small is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered, the four founding members of the Spinnery began to explore how starting a small business together could play a part in revitalizing their community.

The small scale economics described in this book could allow them to re-establish links to local agriculture.  At the time, many New England dairy farms were downsizing and transitioning from large herds of cows to smaller flocks of sheep.  The 1976 oil embargo and fuel crisis was also informing their discussion.  It seemed to be a pivotal moment when a local focus could address many needs.  Their ideas began to coalesce into a three part goal of creating a workplace committed to sustainability, to the thoughtful and responsible use of natural resources, and the support of local small scale farms.

Building a mill that processed yarn from regional materials could lower the overall environmental impact of the skeins it produced, and provide a natural alternative to petroleum based yarns being mass produced outside the US.  Creating a productive use for local fibers of all kinds would support small farm growth and the continued proliferation of heritage breed animals who contribute to a robust biodiversity.  The more complex and robust the system, the more resilient it is against failure.

At this point in 2019, 65-70% of our production is spinning yarns for small fiber producers around the county.  It’s remarkable that these benefits remain as pivotal to our lives today.  In the prevailing years many of us have embraced a desire to use our purchase power more thoughtfully, understanding that our choices can have a cascading effect starting with our local economy, and subsequently the health of our biosphere.  More recently, the folks at Fibershed have worked to continue this conversation and disseminate a more nuanced description of these ideas through community outreach.

 

Casting back again to the early days, Claire, Libby, David and Diana embarked on a six year adventure of research and discovery that would have them travelling to mills around Europe and New England to learn as much as they could about processing yarn.  Fortuitously, they were aided by Ray Phillips, a mill technician at nearby Harrisville Yarns who offered them his valuable expertise.  With his support, they located the machinery they needed piece by piece, and eventually assembled a functioning production floor in a converted gas station at the edge of Putney.  Ray came to join the team within the Spinnery’s first year to supervise and mentor the group as their nascent experience developed.

In late December 1981 the mill shop opened for business and the daily work of the mill began in earnest.  Using and maintaining the machines (that for the most past were decades old), proved challenging.  Replacement parts often need to be machined or re-purposed from tractors, motorcycles or elevators.  The group also experienced a steep learning curve about fibers.  Each batch of yarn provided them a better understanding about how different fibers interacted with the machines and each other for different results. As their expertise grew, it allowed them to more effectively work with fiber producers to create yarns that blend their contents to the best advantage.

In 2003, members of the staff began to explore the possibilities of cooperative ownership.  Cooperatives are people-centered enterprises characterized by democratic control that prioritize human development and social justice within the workplace.  A perfect match for the ideals of the Spinnery.  Over the next three years David and a group of 6 interested employees worked with a consultant to restructure the organization while reaffirming a commitment to the founders’ original goals.  This transition allowed Claire and Libby to retire; to shift from daily work to participation as members of the Cooperative Board of Directors.

For the past thirteen years the Spinnery has continued to produce better and better yarns with a dedicated staff of roughly a dozen; while it’s smaller group of worker owners meets regularly to collectively oversee operations.  All decisions for the organization be they great or small are made by consensus.  This ensures a greater understanding by each member owner of the overall business and every aspect of its intertwined workings.

Gail, Maureen, Lauren, Larisa and David, the current GMS worker-owners, are passionate and dedicated to running a company with a vital working environment, where workers are challenged to make use of their skills. Our workplace prioritizes mutual respect among co-workers, and a healthy environment for our minds and bodies.
“We strive to have a healthy workplace with good pay, benefits, flexible schedules, and an environment where every employee feels supported to show their best ability in what they can bring to the company. We make sure we show integrity in what we charge and what we get in return, and are grateful to receive a fair and healthy profit for our commitment  As a ‘small is beautiful’ company, we work to stay informed about the  conditions of our environment (air, soil, water, planet, animals). Based on these needs, we make decisions and take actions every day to address these challenges.”

You can read more about the Spinnery’s beginnings in The Green Mountain Spinnery Book.

 


Hop in for a Madder Trunk Show next month

Over the past several months, we’ve offered a few reminders about the I-91 Shop Hop, hoping that it will make it on to your calendar. This week we have an exciting announcement that may inspire you to solidify your plans for that weekend!

We’re delighted to announce that Christina of Maine based Madder Root will be bringing her iconic designs for sale at a one-day Pop-up Trunk Show during the I-91 Shop Hop weekend.  We hope that you’ll coordinate your I-91 Shop Hop travel plans to time your visit to the Spinnery while she is here, on Saturday June 29th 10 am – 6 pm.

She and her husband Andy are working on some special offerings that will be available on a first come first served basis.  She will be bringing her unique trundle project bags, tote bags, sketch books, T-shirts and more, all printed with her stylized designs featuring all things yarny!

The I-91 Shop Hop is a yarn crawl organized by 11 yarn stores located in the I-91 corridor that runs from New Haven, CT to Putney, VT.  This year’s theme is COLOR!  And Maureen is working up a special pattern that we’ll have kitted up and ready for sale as the fun starts on Thursday morning.

During the Shop Hop, when visiting the participating shops over the 4-day Shop Hop weekend (June 27th – 30th, 2019) you’ll have the chance to get your passport stamped.  Every time you get your passport stamped you will be entered to win the Daily Door Prize at that shop. A total of 48 door prizes will be given out to participants!  By visiting all 11 shops you will be entered into a drawing for the fabulous $550 Grand Prize, which includes gift certificates for the eleven shops, as well as yarns, needles and other goodies.

Here’s your chance to explore new yarn shops and win some great prizes. You can complete the Shop Hop all in one day, or make it a weekend event.

Feel free to purchase your $5 passport ahead of time.  You can find them available for sale on our website, here.

We hope that you’ll be able to visit us during this special weekend.  We’re looking forward to your visit!

 


We’ve got a new book to share with you!

We’re very pleased to announce that our newest pattern collection is hot off the presses!  At the Spinnery features 12 brand new patterns that you are going to adore!  You can view the entire collection on Ravelry here, or you can pour yourself a mug of something soothing and browse through the stunning photos that Gale Zucker captured for us below.

From top to toe we’ve got you covered.  Some of the accessories can be crafted with just a single skein and we’ll start our review with these.

The Thaw Hat is designed by Kathleen Dames with our Maine Organic yarn.  The pattern includes instructions for two depth measurements and a single skein will be sufficient for either option.  Worked in the round from the ribbed brim up to the star-shaped top of the crown, the Thaw Hat is perfect for the changeable weather that ushers in Spring.

The highly textured stitch pattern combines the refinement of lacy and twisted stitches with the rustic charm of Green Mountain Spinnery’s wonderful worsted weight Maine Organic yarn (organic sheep from organic Maine farms processed using GMS’s GREENSPUN technique, then certified organic by the Vermont Organic Farmers) for maximum impact.

The Snowmelt Cowl designed by Cap Sease.  Worked in the round with a cable and lace pattern that will have you seeing rivulets of melting snow, this cozy cowl can be worn long for drama or wrapped around your neck for warmth.

A perfect one-skein project, the Snowmelt Cowl knits up beautifully in Green Mountain Spinnery’s Simply Fine fingering weight, which combines the softest fibers that we work with!

Your toes will be comforted by the Catkin Socks designed by Amelia Velarde. Worked from the top down with an afterthought heel, the Catkins Socks remind us of wands of pussywillows, one of the first signs of Spring in Vermont, with the lace running down the leg and along the outside of the foot.

The pattern includes three cuff circumference size options and a single skein of Spinnery Forest can be used for all three.  This fingering weight yarn combines the warmth and bounce of Targhee fine wool with the gleam and strength of Tencel® Lyocell (from trees), making it a perfect choice for long-wearing socks.

With just two skeins of Forest, you can work up Bonnie Sennott’s Catharus Shawl. Worked back and forth from the top down with a tab start, the Catharus Shawl (named for the Vermont state bird, the hermit thrush, Catharus guttatus) begins with a wide rib before flowing into a sculptural, nupp-flecked edging.

This shawl is also knit up in Green Mountain Spinnery’s Forest, ensuring that your stitches will pop with clarity and the shawl will drape beautifully.

Another light weight shawl pattern is the Mizuna Shawl designed by Angela Tong and knit up with two skeins of Spinnery Lana.  Worked from one point down and out to the edging, Mizuna is an asymmetrical triangle shawl with a garter stitch body, plus an elegant lace side and edging. Green Mountain Spinnery’s Lana, a fingering weight 100% wool yarn, makes for warm yet light knits.

For those of you who aren’t intimidated by larger projects, this collection includes a host of additional options for you to cast on for.

Kate Salomon created a richly textured circular Millstone Blanket that is worked from the center outward in a shifting garter and slipped stitch pattern that is carefully charted for your ease.  It creates a finished blanket that is 48″ in diameter and calls for 12 skeins of the main color and a single skein of the contrast color.

Juxtapose the rough-hewn texture with the soft warmth of Green Mountain Spinnery’s Mountain Mohair, which combines the luster of fine mohair with the bounce of fine wool for an excellent worsted weight yarn in a rainbow of colors.

At the Spinnery also includes five sweaters and a lightweight vest for you to consider.

Worked in the round from the bottom up, Larisa Demos’ Sap Run Vest sports a simple lace pattern on the front panel that evokes the welling up of sap in the Spring. Green Mountain Spinnery’s Sylvan Spirit adds to the versatility of this piece with its blend of fine wool and Tencel® Lyocell in a DK weight.

The pattern includes sizing options that range from Bust circumference: 37 (40, 44, 48, 52, 56)” / 94 (102, 112, 122, 132, 142) cm and is show here with approximately 7″ of positive ease.  Yardage requirements range from 4 – 8 skeins.

Also knit up with Sylvan Spirit is Maureen Clark’s Green Leaf Pullover.  Worked in the round from the bottom up, the Green Leaf Pullover is covered with little, lacy leaves that make this both an elegant top on its own and a lovely layering piece.  It is shown above with 9″ / 23 cm of positive ease.

The pattern includes instructions for bust circumference: 40 (42, 45, 49, 54, 58)” / 97 (107, 114, 124, 135, 145) cm; and calls from between 5 – 8 skeins of our DK weight yarns.

Also on the lighter side is Ikinngut Pullover designed by Jennifer Dassau that is featured on the book’s cover.  Worked from the top down with a textured yoke, gathers at the empire waist, and a split hem, the Ikinngut (Greenlandic for “friend”) pullover is the perfect comfy sweater with elegant details. (Shown above with zero ease).

You’ll find instructions for bust circumferences: 33.75 (38, 42, 46.25, 49.75, 54)” / 86 (96.5, 106.5, 117.5, 126.5, 137) cm  Yardage requirements range from 5 – 8 skeins of our Cotton Comfort; which makes this a year-round piece with its blend of organic cotton and fine wool, each of which takes the dye differently, producing a unique, speckled color.

Worked in the round from the bottom up, Kathleen Dames’ Sheepscot Pullover combines a classic cable with a simple lace, which are a pleasure to knit up together. Green Mountain Spinnery’s worsted weight Maine Organic shows off both the sculptural cables and the crisp lace. (Shown with 7″ / 18 cm positive ease).

The pattern includes options for bust circumferences: 38 (41, 45, 50, 53, 57)” / 97 (104, 114, 127, 135, 145) cm and calls for between  4 – 6 skeins of our worsted weight organic yarns.

Heather Zopetti’s Buttonbrush Pullover is a tunic length pullover with a lush brioche rib detail that decorates the cowl, cuffs and hem that remind us of the Buttonbush plant.  Worked in the round from the bottom up, this pullover includes waist shaping and seamless set-in sleeves which are picked up and worked down to the cuffs.  Shown with 5″ / 12.5 cm of positive ease.

The pattern includes instructions for bust circumferences: 33 (36.5, 41, 46, 50, 54, 58)” / 84 (92.5, 104, 117, 127, 137, 147.5) cm.

Weekend Wool, Green Mountain Spinnery’s classic soft-yet-strong worsted weight yarn, comes in a beautiful rainbow of options, so you will be sure to find your perfect color combination.  You’ll need between 8 – 13 skeins of the main color and 2-3 skeins of the contrast color.

Worked in pieces and seamed with shawl collar and pockets added during finishing, Amy Herzog’s Greenbanks Hollow Cardigan puts ribbing to use in a way that reminds us of the standing seam roof covered bridge spanning Joe’s Brook, all that is left of the once-thriving milltown of Greenbanks Hollow.

The rich color and beautiful drape of Green Mountain Spinnery’s DK weight Alpaca Elegance make this a cardigan you will want to snuggle into every day.  The pattern includes bust circumference sizing: 35.25 (39.25, 44.75, 48.5, 52.25, 55.75)” / 89.5 (99.5, 113.5, 123, 132.5, 141.5) cm. It is shown above  with 1″ / 2.5 cm positive ease  and calls for between 8 – 13 skeins.

What a wealth of beautiful patterns!  We couldn’t be more excited with this collection.

We’d like to thank all of the amazing designers who joined us for this adventure.  As well as photographer Gale Zuker (@galezucker) and our lovely models: Ariana and Rachel (@arianamclean and @rachel_toussaint).  This could not have come to fruition without the hard work of Alison and Kathleen of One More Row Press.

If you are in the Bay Area this weekend, we hope that you’ll stop by our booth (817 – 819) at Stitches West, where you’ll be able to see all these stunning samples in person and select the size and yarn you need to get started on the pattern that calls to you!


Looking ahead

The arrival of seed catalogs has the gardeners among us enjoying visions of summer produce as snow drifts start to deepen this time of year.  For us crafters, knitting publications offer much the same respite.  Leafing through pages of possible projects can start us dreaming of next season and garments we’d like to have ready by then.

Carrie Bostick Hoge’s newest collection Madder Anthology 3: Seaside was introduced on Raverly this week and we can’t wait for our copies to arrive in March.

© Carrie Bostick Hoge

“The third and final book of the Anthology series, Seaside, by Carrie Bostick Hoge, includes 16 knit patterns: 11 sweaters and 5 accessories. Seaside is a dreamy collection of knitwear photographed on the incredible coast of Maine. For this third collection, Carrie set out to complement the first two books by including a bit of texture, cables, and colorwork while staying true to Madder’s signature wearable style.”

Her designs are simple and elegant, feminine and yet practical in their wearability.  These are the kinds of garments that we can easily imagine wearing on a seaside holiday or to the local market.  And the photography of this collection will have you happily dreaming of warm ocean breezes and walks in the heather.

© Carrie Bostick Hoge

We have to confess a preference for her Winter Escape Pullover.  In part because of the name, but also because it was designed with Spinnery Cotton Comfort!

This delicate v-neck embodies an artful balance of rugged and refined.  The lace work that encircles the neckline and adorns the front is balanced by garter stitch hem and cuffs.  The rustic tweediness of the yarn creates visual interest among the stockinette stitches for a soft texture that mimics the weathered shoreline of Maine, evoking memories or dreams of a visit worth taking.

The print version of Madder Anthology 3 is also available for preorder ONLY at makingzine.com as part of a print book & ebook combo. If you order this combo through the Making site, the ebook will be sent to you right away and the print book will begin shipping in March 2019.  So for those among us that are digitally inclined, you could get cast on without delay!

You’ll find that our collection of Cotton Comfort has a hue for everyone, with two dozen shades to choose from.  We hope that this little preview of Spring fuels your dreams of warmer days to come.


Extending the deadline

The holiday season can be hectic with all there is to manage.  We know how hard it can be to keep track of every detail when they start to accumulate like snow drifts.  So we’re extending our registration deadline for our 2019 Mystery Project Club registration through the end of the month.

And to help you better understand what kinds of projects you could expect to work on, we thought we’d share a peek at the patterns that were a part of our 2018 Club.  These patterns were designed to use a Green Mountain Spinnery yarn along with a custom spun yarn that we produced here at our Mill.  Throughout this past year, our club members received information about these four fiber producers and their flocks along with their project.

In February last year, we shared Cap Sease’s Polar Teddy with our club members.  This darling little stuffie was created with downy soft Catskill Merino yarn and filled with our carded fleece.

In late April, we sent Larisa Demos’ Cirone Shawl, named after Jenny Cirone who was the original shepherd of a flock that still thrives on Nash Island off the coast of Maine.  This little crescent shawl pairs Nash Island Tide yarn with Spinnery Alpaca Elegance.

In July our members received a package that included all the materials they needed to make Kate Salomon’s Lopez Island Cap.  This double layer lace beanie incorporates an unusual construction that pairs Spinnery Meadow as a soft inner layer and Island Fibers’ Rustic Sport yarn as a hearty lace outside.

Finally, in October we sent out the news about Maureen Clark’s Swedish Mittens which pairs our Weekend Wool with Meadowood Farms’ 2-Ply Lamb’s Wool.  This traditional stranded mitten pattern arrived in time for holiday gifting and may have ended up under a number of Christmas trees.

These patterns will be made available to the public later this month, so you’ll be able to find them here on our website and on Ravelry for individual purchase.

The patterns we’ve designed for our 2019 Club members will be similar in nature to these designs.  They will be small accessory patterns that involve 2-3 skeins of yarn.  And this year, we’ve partnered with several of the independent dyers we spin for and our 2019 projects will include hand-painted skeins in custom made hues exclusively available to our club members!

More information, and our registration form for the 2019 Mystery Club can be found here.   If you’d like to purchase membership as a gift for a friend, or would like to receive these packages overseas, give us a call at 800-321-9665 and we can gather all of the details over the phone.

We hope that a few extra weeks will make it easier for you to get signed up, so that you won’t have to suffer from the fear of missing out as our first packages begin to arrive later this winter.


Save the Date!

Happy New Year!  We’re very happy to announce that we’ll be part of the fun of the 2nd annual Boston Farm & Fiber Festival.  Mark your calendars for Febraury 10th 2019!

This very special one day event brings some of our favorite fiber producers together in one convenient spot in downtown Boston.  You’ll find locally sourced skeins of all kinds (many of which were spun at the Spinnery).  And this year, we’ll be participating as vendors and share a new bulky weight limited edition yarn that we’ve spun up just for the occasion.  It incorporates 100% New England sourced wool and was spun here at our VT mill; Super duper local!

This yarn is a 100% wool put up in 4 oz. skeins of approximately 112 yds each.  It can be used for all of our patterns that call for our Capricorn yarn.  A couple of our favorites, the Capricorn Caps  and the Steps & Ladders Hat can create 2 adult hats with 2 contrasting skeins.

We’ll be using the intervening weeks to hand paint a few dozen of these variegated skeins in lush irresistible colors for the event.  We hope that you’ll be free to come enjoy the day with us.  We’ve updated our 2019 calendar so that you’ll be able to mark yours with all of the wooly gatherings we have planned for the year.


Just around the corner

In just over a week, our January Sale will begin!

Soon to arrive in your mailboxes (email or actual) will be our annual Sales Flyer!  From Monday January 7th to Friday February 8th, 2019 we’ll have special discounts available on some of our most popular yarns!

You can find a copy of our flyer here.  You may want to plan your purchases by reviewing your pattern options and making sure that you’ll have the yardage you need!

For those of you shopping online, be sure to shop among the SALE ITEMS, to ensure proper savings. (Those listings won’t be visible on our website until our sale begins on January 8th).  You’ll find small quantities of additional yarns and colors among the yarns featured there.


Come join us

We are excited to announce that Julia Farwell-Clay will be the featured instructor for the Spinnery’s 2019 Sugar Season Knitting Retreat.

Julia brings to her knitting students an abundance of knitting experience and a boundless enthusiasm for the craft. Her distinctive patterns can be recognized by their graphic interest and a modern twist on traditional color techniques.

She will share with us her current passion for intarsia colorwork, refreshing this classic technique through fresh applications.  We’ll begin with an intarsia introduction, then we’ll learn more about her eddy shells (shown in the cowl above). On Sunday, we’ll conclude by working on a beautifully simple and graphic mitten in the round, practicing various stranding options and possible embellishments.

Your registration fee of $375 per person includes three meals (Friday dinner, Saturday lunch and dinner) and nine hours of instruction on March 15th – 17th, 2019.

This year’s event will be held at the Hampton Inn in Brattleboro. We have a block of rooms reserved for you at the discounted rate of $125.00 per night. Please contact the Hamp­ton Inn to make your reservation using the code “Spinnery”.  These rooms are limited so register early!

 This is a retreat in the truest sense: a weekend away, moments of peace and quiet, a chance to visit Vermont with your needles and yarn and knit with like-minded crafters who are equally excited about learning new tips and techniques from one of our favorite designers.

Space is limited, so you’ll want to register as soon as possible, before our spaces fill.  You can find our registration form here.