New pattern suggestions for Cotton Comfort

We find that we and our friends reach for skeins of Cotton Comfort to work with as summer heats up.  Our DK weight blend of 80% of the finest wool we work with  and 20% organic cotton grown in Texas is a delight in the hands.  It has a comforting elasticity, a nubby texture and a color palette that is second only to our Mountain Mohair.

We wanted to use this week’s post to keep you up to date on some fresh new patterns that call for Cotton Comfort from some of Raverlry’s most popular designers.

Julie Weisenberger (of Cocoknits fame) recently publish Rosa, a figure flattering top-down pullover that is sure to become a classic.

© Cocoknits

The pattern features the Cocoknits Method of construction, “a commonsense system for knitting seamless, tailored sweaters from the top down. The Cocoknits Method is explained in detail in the book, Cocoknits Sweater Workshop by Julie Weisenberger, which includes 9 core patterns. The book is a necessary tool for knitting this and the other Cocoknits Method patterns.”

On a side note, Kate tried out this method of construction by knitting a version of Julie’s Antonia/Antonio sweater and was delighted by the clever construction and perfect fit created by this (new to her) English tailoring technique.  It creates a shoulder seam that the weight of the sweater can hang on, that sits a bit behind your shoulders for a more accurate fit and a better silhouette.  The anatomy of the sweater more closely mimics how our bodies move.  You’ll recognize the  look from machine knit sweaters in your wardrobe.

For those of you who would be more likely to wear a cardigan, you may want to consider taking a look at Asscher designed by by Christina Danaee as part of her StoneCutter Collection.

© Olive & West Photography

“The Asscher cardigan is an open, raglan cardigan featuring an angular eyelet pattern across the back. The eyelet shaping at the shoulders is echoed in the pattern on the back and the ribbed eyelet trim of the front. Green Mountain Spinnery’s Cotton Comfort yarn has a slight fleck of color creating a tweed-like appearance, and makes a perfect all-weather garment. Make one in any color to throw over jeans and a t-shirt, your favorite dress or layer with a flannel in colder weather.”

We agree that it looks like a perfect layering piece.

On the smaller side, is a kiddo knit for you to consider.  Summertime is a perfect time to select smaller projects that are easy to transport on your summer holidays.  New to Ravelry is Nemunoki designed by Simone Kereit, with sizes ranging from 3M to 2 years.

© Simone Kereit / OwlCat Designs

This darling little top could be worn as a wee dress and then layered over leggings as a tunic, extending its wearability.  We love the bright pop of color created by the slipped stitch texturing.

We hope that summer’s heat doesn’t prevent you from your favorite past time, and that the right project can keep you happily stitching (perhaps in front of an air conditioner) all season long.


What’s on our needles this week

We know how much fun it can be to take a look at what other people are working on, so we thought we’d share the “wips” on our needles this week.

While many of us are guilty of working on a handful of projects at any given moment, these are the projects that came to work with us this Thursday in the hopes that a few stitches could be worked at lunch or when our machines were humming along with occasional intervention.

Tracey is about a third of the way through an elegantly simple vest that will become a new wardrobe staple this fall.  She is working on His Vest designed by Churchmouse Yarns and Teas, with a few pattern modifications to adjust the length for a personalized fit.  She selected the Mean Mr. Mustard colorway from the Spinnery’s Mewesic line.

This lofty DK weight 100% wool yarn is a pleasure to work with and will make a lightweight and yet warm layer that will be perfect for in between season temperature swings.  Her pattern is worked flat from the bottom up, and seamed before the finishing touches of the ribbed v-neck and armholes is worked.

Kate is making some headway with her Clio pullover designed by Elizabeth Doherty.  Kate chose to work with the undyed Silver colorway of our Cotton Comfort.  The addition of 20% cotton in these skeins lends lovely nubbiness to the textured stitches and should make the fabric drape just a bit for a flattering finished piece.

Clio has a top-down, seamless construction that allows the knitter to try it on while in progress. The pattern includes instructions for two lengths making it a versatile option for everyone.  Maureen is also working on a version of this sweater and we hope to share photos of both finished projects soon.

Kate hopes to have this sweater complete in plenty of time to cast on another of Elizabeth’s designs before she arrives in October to teach at our Knitters Weekend.  We love having plenty of samples available to try on so that our friends and fellow students can find new project inspiration and leave the weekend knowing exactly which size of the pattern they want to cast on for.

Megan is very close to finishing a beautifully neutral version of Melody Hoffman’s Kimono pattern.  She selected the Fawn color of our Weekend Wool for a cozy, slouchy shrug that will go with every outfit.

“The pattern is very easy and comes up in three different sizes.  It features a little bit of lace, a lot of stockinette, and a very addictive slipped stitch panel on the back (a video is provided to help you execute the slipped stitch. It is knit flat, like a large rectangle, and a little bit of seaming brings the sides together to create the opening for the sleeves.”

So elegant!  We hope to share photos of her finished project when it is off her needles.

And last but not least, Larisa is putting the finishing touches on a new cowl pattern that will become available this fall.

Her infinity cowl design features an organic lace pattern inspired by the beautiful Latte Art to be found on the beverages served at Larisa’s favorite cafe in Bellows Falls.  This sneak peek shows her project with the Orchid colorway of our worsted weight Weekend Wool.

Check back here in several weeks for more details on this upcoming design!


Protecting your hand knits

The unofficial start of summer with Memorial Day weekend has many of us thinking about storing our winter woolens away for the season.  Ensuring that our hand knits will be clean and in good repair when we’re ready to pull them out of storage in the Fall, will allow us to start wearing them without delay when we’re ready to bring them back into wardrobe rotation.

Martha Stewart has a terrific article about mothproofing that includes the how and why of the multiple steps involved in preparing your woolens to ensure the best results.  You can find the full article on her website here.

In a nutshell, “cleaning woolens rids them of moth and beetle eggs and also eliminates perspiration remnants and food spills, which attract and nourish pests. Moths and beetles don’t eat items made of synthetic or cotton fabrics, but you should clean those, too, if you store them with woolens.”

Taking the time to inspect each item before putting it away for the season can give you a moment to look for signs of wear that may need a bit of darning.  We also like to de-pill our well loved garments to revitalize them.  This way they will emerge from storage ready to wear and looking their best.

Since the pests that love to munch holes in our woolens are so small and able to wriggle into the tightest of crannies, the best short term storage is air-tight.  If you are planning to put things away for stretches of time longer than a year, you may want to do a bit of web research to find alternate options that will be impervious to small pests and yet allow your clothes to breathe.  Trapping moisture inside an airtight container with your woolens would lead to another set of problems.

To clean our shop samples, we add like colors into a top-loading washer that will allow us to soak the items without agitation.  You could also soak items one at a time (particularly if you have concerns about colors bleeding) in a sink, large bowl or bucket.  We add a splash of Eucalan, but you may want to consider using any of the other wool washes available on the market.  The milder the detergent the better.

After a 20-30 minute soak,  we allow the machine to spin out the items removing as much water as possible.  You could squeeze your items (without wringing them) and then roll them up in dry towels like a burrito.  Walking across the burrito will remove even more water and render your woolens just damp to the touch.

Lay your items out someplace flat, out of direct sunlight, where they can dry undisturbed.  You can use this opportunity to re-block your items into your desired measurements.  You may want to select your washing day based on the weather forecast, selecting a time when you’ll have several dry days in a row giving your woolens plenty of time to dry completely.   If the forecast doesn’t cooperate but you have a dehumidifier, you may want to dry your woolens in close proximity to it for similar results.  Here in the damp Northeast, that can be essential for success.

Cedar and lavender both provide natural pest protection (with some limitations) that leave a pleasant scent behind.  We’ve recently received a small shipment of some locally crafted cedar hanger rings.  Each dozen is available for $15 and you can find them on our website here.  Adding these to the cleaned items in your closet or within air-tight storage containers can help maintain your hand knits’ integrity.

If you find holes or signs of moth damage, your best resort is to freeze those pests out!  We “put items in sealed plastic bags, squeeze out air, and freeze for a few days. Take the bags out, let them return to room temperature (or better yet, place them in a hot car in the summer sun), and then repeat. In case of condensation, let clothes air out before storing again.”

If you need some expert help repairing larger holes, give us a call and we can put you in touch with a local knitter who has worked miracles for our customers over the years.  Susan has provided flawless finishing, button hole repair and mending work for many of our friends who are are too busy or reluctant to try their hand on precious hand knits that took many hours to complete.

Feel free to give us a call if you have any questions as you dive into washing your woolens for summer storage.  We’d love to share our suggestions and any additional tips that could help.


Pop! Here comes Spring

Spring arrives a bit late here in Vermont.  While we see our Instagram feeds fill with photos of early blossoms from elsewhere in the world, our gardens are just now losing their blanket of snow.

So our Spring color comes in a slightly different form.  We’ve been working through our colored yarns this week in production.  This plethora of rich hues have made the Spinnery a vibrant place to be.  We’ve carded, spun and skeined several colors in our Mountain Mohair line including: Vincent’s Gold, Midnight Blue, Wintergreen, Claret, and Elderberry.

These colors have transformed our production floor into an early spring garden bed (of sorts) and has us all eager to start working with more color in our crafts as well as at work.

The yarn that has been taking center stage in all of this, is a new batch of our Peach Beryl Sylvan Spirit.  We’ve bumped up the color intensity and created skeins that are mouthwateringly fresh and juicy.  You can see the difference below.  The skein on top is from the new dye lot and the one on the bottom is from the previous one.

This fun new dye lot makes us think of cantaloupe, peaches, clementines, and sherbert.  What could be better for warmer weather knits?  Kate keeps picturing this yarn for a wee dress or tunic, perhaps paired with the new Citrine colorway, it could make a playful version of Annie Rowden’s Polka Dot Tunic.

© byAnnieClaire

If the thought of a child’s dress appeals to you, there are many more pattern options for you to consider on Ravelry.

You might also want to consider it for a shawl.   Briston Ivy’s Knúsa (published in the Share issue of Taproot Magazine) would be a delight to work and would bring this delightfully warm color into your life to brighten any room or rainy day.

© Bristol Ivy/Leah B. Thibault

We’ve also flirted with the idea of making some knitted or crocheted Easter eggs.  Since we didn’t get this project started early enough, we may end up simply using the skeins to decorate our holiday table!

Who wouldn’t want to find a basket such as this, full of candy and skeins left by the Easter Bunny in their garden?  We hope that you have a delightful holiday weekend and that signs of Spring are popping up all around you as well this week.

 


Signs of Spring

In celebration of the first hints of Spring that have appeared in Vermont this week, we have a new pattern to share with you that has made our winter months more colorful.  We’ve been hard at work over the past several weeks knitting up samples that have made us feel like artists.

Our Expressionist Shawl pairs our tweedy neutral Sock Art Lana with Fiber Optic Yarns Foot Notes Paintbox gradients to spectacular effect.  Shown here, it’s knit up with 2 skeins of Lana in the Gris colorway and the Light Into Darkness gradient set.  Kate worked her stripes moving from dark to light with the lengthening spring days in mind as she worked.

It’s simple asymmetrical shape is constructed with a lengthy cast on and diminishing rows that speed your progress.  The garter stitch fabric is lofty and elastic, and oh so comforting to wrap up with.

It’s a perfect project for social knitting or a lengthy trip.  A bit of intarsia at one end keeps things interesting and you’ll love watching the progression of colors as you work through Kimber’s mouthwatering gradient shades.

This second sample was made with Lana in the lighter Plateada colorway and the Onyx to Crimson gradient.  Jenny created this shawl working her stripes from light to dark ensuring that her favorite shade of crimson would make the boldest impression on the longest edge of her shawl.  As you can see, the shawl’s generous dimensions (56″ x 32″) make it a cozy fit.

The hardest part of this project will be selecting which paintbox colorway to play with!  We hope that you’ll select a spectrum of your favorite colors, or one that recalls a special place or time. Your shawl will become a beautiful expression of what you love.

Our friends Kimber and Ellie of Fiber Optic Yarns are debuting their stunning samples of the Expressionist Shawl this weekend at their booth at the DFW Fiber Fest in Dallas Texas.  We hope that if you are in that area, you’ll have a chance to stop by and check out their works of art in person.

We’ll be debuting our samples later this month at the Spinnery booth at Stitches United in Hartford, CT; and would love to share the fun of this project with you there.  In the meantime, we hope that your days ahead are made more colorful with beautiful knits and spring blossoms.

 


And the winner is…

Our Groundhog Day Knitalong concluded late last week and we were delighted to see the progress that was made.  We really enjoyed the photos that many of you shared along with notes about your projects.  Some terrific knits were started, and a few were cast off within our allotted time frame; making them eligible to be entered in the drawing for our prize.

We thought we’d share some of the finished projects so that you can see what was created with our delicious Vermont Organic yarn.

Here at the Spinnery, Larisa made a pair of Double Stuff Mittens with the grey organic yarn on the outside, and Rosehip Alpaca Elegance as the snuggly inside.  Maureen got a warm cardigan started.  Her Barnard sweater designed by Lori Versaci is about 3/4 complete, with just the sleeves remaining to be knit.  And Meghan completed a Sundottir pullover designed by Diana Walla.  She combined both colors of the Vermont Organic yarn to stunning effect!

You may have seen a photo of Carrie’s lovely Brezel hat here a couple of weeks ago, when we featured some recently finished customer projects.  We love the way this rustic yarn makes textures like ribs and cables pop with clarity.

Jolene from Washington state started a pair of Ah Caramel fingerless gloves designed by Tanis Lavallee.  As you can see, the creamy white yarn makes her cable work look like a million dollars!  And we imagine that these will keep her nice and toasty warm.

The randomly selected winner of our prize, Joy, finished a pair of very snuggly looking socks with a few weeks to spare!  She shared these details about her project, “Best socks ever, like hugs for your feet. Great yarn, great pattern.  The socks are fun to knit with the knit/purl sequence creating the interesting stitch pattern.  I will use this yarn again…a sweater, I think., it’s that lovely.”

Her socks were created with the FREE pattern designed by Ingrid Nødtvedt.

Gulfoss

When we contacted her to let her know that she’d won a Spinnery tote bag and pattern of her choice, she selected Cap Sease’s Gulfoss pattern.  We can’t wait to see how that knits up for her, and what colors she chooses to work with.

Thanks to everyone who cast on with us and shared their progress.  Our virtual knitting circle made the last few weeks of winter pass with a shared sense of community and fun.  We’ll reach out to you all shortly before we start our next knitalong to find out if you have suggestions or preferences about what we all get started next!


Celebrate National Crochet month with us

Perhaps you already knew that March is National Crochet month.   The fun folks over at Crochetville, have organized a blog tour that you should follow if you are eager to get some inspiration for great crochet projects and yarns. This year’s theme focuses on “glamping” otherwise known as glamorous camping.

If your idea of the perfect camping trips includes a warm bed under a sturdy canvas roof, or a warm beverage beside a fireside; you’re in good company!  We like to imagine glamping as if we were characters in Out of Africa, fine china, polished silver and all.

And with that in mind, Maureen has created a fun new crochet pattern: The Sierra Cowl.  This pattern was inspired on her recent trip to California, home of some of the most glamorous camping we know of in Yosemite National Park.

This fun infinity cowl can be crafted up in just a few hours with 2 contrasting skeins of Spinnery Cotton Comfort.  Maureen completed hers on a transcontinental flight that brought her from Hartford, CT to San Jose, CA.  Shown above, our sample was created with a skein each of Phlox and Silver.

For the next 30 days, we’re offering a 10% discount on the Sierra Club project.  You can receive 10% off your purchase of Cotton Comfort and the pattern by using the coupon code NATCRO17 at check out.  (This offer is valid through 4/18/17).

We hope that this may inspire you to get a cowl of your own started before the end of March so that you too can be part of the fun of National Crochet month!


Off the needle superstars

We love browsing through photos on Ravelry.  It can be so inspiring to see what other folks are working on and better yet, what they’ve recently finished.  This week, we want to share some of our favorites so that you can enjoy these knits as much as we do.  You might find your next project among some of these ideas!

© jennaleeashburn

Our friend Jenna Lee from nearby Massachusetts joined the Fancy Tiger Knitalong and created a Wolf River pullover designed by Melissa Schaschwary using Spinnery Weekend Wool.  We love how the grey ragg color adds visual texture enlivening the sweater’s stockinette sections.  It looks wonderfully wearable with almost anything! Beautiful work Jenna, and thank you for sharing with us!

Kelly from Texas is an amazingly prolific knitter.  Her project page will delight you, as it did us!  We discovered her Cascade cardigan designed by Amy Herzog and knew that you’d want to take a peek.

© KellyInTexas

Kelly’s sweater is such a perfect fit because she made use of Amy Herzog’s Custom Fit program that generated a version of the pattern specially tailored to her body measurements and gauge.  We’ve been continuously delighted by Amy’s designs, and the one of a kind ability to make them a perfect flattering fit is such a treat.

Kelly created her cardigan with Brickhouse Mewesic, for a 3 season sweater that is a classic.  You’ll want to browse through her other photos to be able to appreciate the crisp lacework on the back that makes this project such a stunner.

Our friend Charissa played with four different yarns to create a gorgeous pair of Baa-ble Mittens.  Her sheep look picture perfect with their realistic coloring.

© cmflame

The feet and faces of her darling flock were created with our Jet Black Mountain Mohair.  What a fun pair of mittens; who wouldn’t want a handful of sheep to help keep their fingers toasty warm?  And speaking of which…

© oalewis

 

© oalewis

Olga created a breathtakingly delicate shawl with yarn that was spun here at the Spinnery as a custom project for the folks at Catskill Merino Sheep Farm in upstate New York.  She knit up the Echo Flower Shawl designed by Jenny Johnson Johnen.  Her project page features a series of photos that follows her yarn from the flock to the finished work of art.

© elliemay

Straight from the cover of Winter 2016 Knitscene, Ellie created a Slopes Cardigan with Spinnery Weekend Wool.   She opted to create a version of the sweater exactly as it was depicted and we love how the elegant simplicity of the pattern compliments the rusticity of our woolen spun yarn.

Next, we have two sweaters created with our Cotton Comfort.  This 80/20 blend of wool and cotton is a pleasure to work with.  It’s soft hand has a wonderful bouncy elasticity thanks to the high wool content.  It makes a comforting breathable fabric that is perfect for 3 season wear.

© yarnfloozy

We think you’ll agree that the tincanknits Prairie Fire pullover looks as though it would be as much fun ton construct as it will be to wear.  Dotty created her sweater in crisp and classic navy, and we love how the tweed and lace work together.  Beautiful work Dotty!

Michele’s Arcade pullover was designed by Isabel Kraemer.  She selected silver Cotton Comfort and has created a sweater that looks fantastic on her.  She indicates in her project notes that the pattern was well written and a pleasure to follow.  We want to cast on for similar sweaters without delay!

© MicheleDesautels

Last but certainly not least is a project dear to our hearts because it was created as part of our Groundhog Day Knitalong that concludes next week  on the 16th.

© riversidespinner

Carrie created a lovely version of the Brezel hat designed by Svetlana Volkova, using our Vermont Organic yarn.  She is flirting with the idea of dying her hat and we look forward to seeing how it will be transformed!

We hope that you enjoyed this little tour through some of our current Ravelry favorites.  We hope to be able to share your photos in the near future so be sure to share your progress with our Raverly group or on our Facebook page.  That way, our little community can remain in touch no matter the distance between us!


One last Snow Day

If you follow our Instagram feed, than you may have seen that Maureen recently cast off a Snow Day Shawl designed by Knitting Expat Designs.

This beauty is created with three skeins of Spinnery Cotton Comfort (seen above in Juniper, Weathered Green and Unbleached White).

This shawl stole its fair share of attention at our booth at STITCHES West last weekend, so we thought we’d share some of the different color combinations that shoppers came up with that you might enjoy working with.

Pictured here is Navy, Denim and Bluet

Pictured here is Yarrow, Maize and Unbleached White

Pictured here is Iris, Violet and Unbleached White

Pictured here is Leaf, Peony and Phlox

March usually delivers a few more heavy snowfalls, so in spite of the recent balmy temperatures, we anticipate that there may be a few more snowy knitting days in store for us this season.

We’ll make sure to have a trio of beautifully complimentary skeins ready to go so that we can create a shawl like Maureen’s to enjoy this Spring.  Are you tempted to as well?


Just around the corner

Temperatures are warming up here in Vermont and that has us eagerly anticipating Spring, which is likely to be delayed by a few more messy late winter storms.  In an effort to change our perspective on any upcoming precipitation, we’ve got a new pattern to play with: Wintery Mix. We hope that this project will have us looking forward to gloomy weather forecasts instead of dreading them.

The pattern includes four stitch patterns named after weather patterns (snow, rain, sleet and ice) that can be worked at your discretion.  A bit like a choose your own adventure novel, you can select your stitches based on the weather outside your window, or follow your creative inspiration and knit them as you like.

This asymmetrical shawl pattern designed by Kate Salomon is worked from the bottom up, making each row a couple of stitches shorter than the last.  Your shawl will be worked up in time for warmer weather giving you a light and comforting three season accessory that you’ll enjoy in the weeks to come.

Wintery Mix calls for 3-4 skeins of our DK weight yarns: Cotton Comfort, Mewesic, Alpaca Elegance, Sylvan Spirit or New Mexico Organic.  Shown above, our samples were knit up in Brickhouse Mewesic and Silver Cotton Comfort.  Yardage required to complete the pattern will vary based on the stitch patterns you select so we recommend getting adequate yardage to ensure that you don’t run short.

We’ll be featuring these two beautiful shawls at our booth in Santa Clara, CA at the STITCHES West Marketplace, this weekend.  We hope that you can drop by and visit us to see them for yourself!  This fun project is one you are sure to enjoy.


Mark your calendars!

We have two fun events for you to look forward to!  In just a few weeks the I-91 Shop Hop Bag Day  (on Tuesday March 14th, 2017) could provide you with a discount of 10% at ANY of the 11 participating stores!

Simply bring in any of the bags from previous I-91 Shop Hops to any of the 11 participating stores, you’ll receive a 10% discount on your entire purchase!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Mountain Spinnery (Putney, VT)
HandKnits (Brattleboro, VT)
Sheep & Shawl (Deerfield, MA)
Northampton Wools (Northampton, MA)
WEBS (Northampton, MA)
Marji’s Yarncrafts (Granby, CT)
Village Wool (Glastonbury, CT)
Country Yarns (Wallingford, CT)
Knit New Haven (New Haven, CT)
Yarn Barn (Woodbridge, CT)
The Yarn Basket (Branford, CT)

And while you’re here, you can purchase your $5 passport for the 2017 Shop Hop!  Mark your calendars for June 22nd – 25th, 2017!

Plan on a fun weekend full of yarn store visits, daily raffles and several prizes that you’ll be delighted by.  This year’s Grand Prize includes yarn, books, tools and accessories as well as a $50 gift certificates from all 11 participating shops!

We’ll have some exciting new patterns to share with you as well as some special limited edition yarns and sale items that you won’t find anywhere else.  We’re looking forward to your visit.


Stitches in the wild

Kay and Ann of Mason Dixon Knitting fame have created a new line of Field Guides that are delightful guides to knitting techniques to be enjoyed by beginners and intermediate knitters alike.

Field guides have more typically have introduced us to animals, minerals and plants to be found in their natural habitat. We carry their well thumbed pages on hikes or on birding expeditions to correctly identify the new creatures we come across and better understand their habits.

These mini books offer similar guidance through two knitting techniques with carefully constructed descriptions, artful photography as well as a handful of stunning patterns that give us the opportunity to practice these concepts.  Using your hands to learn these ideas with stitches on your needles transforms these ideas into muscle memory that you won’t soon forget.

Mason-Dixon Knitting Field Guide No. 1 is all about the stripes: a trio of patterns that play with the way a single line of color can transform a project.  Mary Jane Mucklestone’s Station Wagon Blanket is a brilliantly simple stripe pattern–made in garter stitch blocks, it is perfect for travel or TV knitting.  Antonia Shankland’s Breton Cowl imagines what happens when you combine two of the softest yarns in the world in one delicious loop.  And Ann Weaver, always inventive, makes one brief and bright contrast stripe the star of the show in her Squad Mitts.

All along the way, Kay and Ann share stories, tips, and hints to make it all even more fun. Sara Remington’s photographs are at once epic and intimate, a special sort of inspiration for every knitter.”

Field Guide No. 2: Fair Isle,  provides a mix of patterns that make it possible to play with stranded colorwork at whatever level you’d like to try.  Easy. Easier. Easiest.  A colorful yoke. A modern Fair Isle pattern. Socks with something happening.”  Véronik Avery’s Hadley Pullover is a bottom up yoked pullover that features a simple modern design that recalls European stranded colorwork and Native American trade blankets at the same time.  Ann Budd contributed a quickly knit sock pattern: the Après-Anything Socks, and Michèle Rose Orne’ Asterik/Dot Hat and Cowl patterns will have you comfortable working with two strands of color in no time.

We’ve been delighted with these guides and have had to restock our supply several times since introducing them in our shop.  If you haven’t yet browsed through their pages, you may want to pick up copies now while armchair travelling is at its best.  These books will allow you to explore new knits without ever leaving home!